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dc.contributor.authorWalker, PJ
dc.contributor.authorFirth, C
dc.contributor.authorWiden, SG
dc.contributor.authorBlasdell, KR
dc.contributor.authorGuzman, H
dc.contributor.authorWood, TG
dc.contributor.authorParadkar, PN
dc.contributor.authorHolmes, EC
dc.contributor.authorTesh, RB
dc.contributor.authorVasilakis, N
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T01:27:04Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T01:27:04Z
dc.date.issued2015-02-01
dc.identifierpii: PPATHOGENS-D-14-01712
dc.identifier.citationWalker, P. J., Firth, C., Widen, S. G., Blasdell, K. R., Guzman, H., Wood, T. G., Paradkar, P. N., Holmes, E. C., Tesh, R. B. & Vasilakis, N. (2015). Evolution of Genome Size and Complexity in the Rhabdoviridae. PLOS PATHOGENS, 11 (2), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1004664.
dc.identifier.issn1553-7366
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259366
dc.description.abstractRNA viruses exhibit substantial structural, ecological and genomic diversity. However, genome size in RNA viruses is likely limited by a high mutation rate, resulting in the evolution of various mechanisms to increase complexity while minimising genome expansion. Here we conduct a large-scale analysis of the genome sequences of 99 animal rhabdoviruses, including 45 genomes which we determined de novo, to identify patterns of genome expansion and the evolution of genome complexity. All but seven of the rhabdoviruses clustered into 17 well-supported monophyletic groups, of which eight corresponded to established genera, seven were assigned as new genera, and two were taxonomically ambiguous. We show that the acquisition and loss of new genes appears to have been a central theme of rhabdovirus evolution, and has been associated with the appearance of alternative, overlapping and consecutive ORFs within the major structural protein genes, and the insertion and loss of additional ORFs in each gene junction in a clade-specific manner. Changes in the lengths of gene junctions accounted for as much as 48.5% of the variation in genome size from the smallest to the largest genome, and the frequency with which new ORFs were observed increased in the 3' to 5' direction along the genome. We also identify several new families of accessory genes encoded in these regions, and show that non-canonical expression strategies involving TURBS-like termination-reinitiation, ribosomal frame-shifts and leaky ribosomal scanning appear to be common. We conclude that rhabdoviruses have an unusual capacity for genomic plasticity that may be linked to their discontinuous transcription strategy from the negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome, and propose a model that accounts for the regular occurrence of genome expansion and contraction throughout the evolution of the Rhabdoviridae.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleEvolution of Genome Size and Complexity in the Rhabdoviridae
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.ppat.1004664
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of BioSciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyScience
melbourne.source.titlePLoS Pathogens
melbourne.source.volume11
melbourne.source.issue2
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1208821
melbourne.contributor.authorFirth, Cadhla
dc.identifier.eissn1553-7374
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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