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dc.contributor.authorWilson, N
dc.contributor.authorNghiem, N
dc.contributor.authorEyles, H
dc.contributor.authorMhurchu, CN
dc.contributor.authorShields, E
dc.contributor.authorCobiac, LJ
dc.contributor.authorCleghorn, CL
dc.contributor.authorBlakely, T
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T01:43:00Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T01:43:00Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-26
dc.identifierpii: 10.1186/s12937-016-0161-1
dc.identifier.citationWilson, N., Nghiem, N., Eyles, H., Mhurchu, C. N., Shields, E., Cobiac, L. J., Cleghorn, C. L. & Blakely, T. (2016). Modeling health gains and cost savings for ten dietary salt reduction targets. NUTRITION JOURNAL, 15 (1), https://doi.org/10.1186/s12937-016-0161-1.
dc.identifier.issn1475-2891
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259454
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Dietary salt reduction is included in the top five priority actions for non-communicable disease control internationally. We therefore aimed to identify health gain and cost impacts of achieving a national target for sodium reduction, along with component targets in different food groups. METHODS: We used an established dietary sodium intervention model to study 10 interventions to achieve sodium reduction targets. The 2011 New Zealand (NZ) adult population (2.3 million aged 35+ years) was simulated over the remainder of their lifetime in a Markov model with a 3 % discount rate. RESULTS: Achieving an overall 35 % reduction in dietary salt intake via implementation of mandatory maximum levels of sodium in packaged foods along with reduced sodium from fast foods/restaurant food and discretionary intake (the "full target"), was estimated to gain 235,000 QALYs over the lifetime of the cohort (95 % uncertainty interval [UI]: 176,000 to 298,000). For specific target components the range was from 122,000 QALYs gained (for the packaged foods target) down to the snack foods target (6100 QALYs; and representing a 34-48 % sodium reduction in such products). All ten target interventions studied were cost-saving, with the greatest costs saved for the mandatory "full target" at NZ$1260 million (US$820 million). There were relatively greater health gains per adult for men and for Māori (indigenous population). CONCLUSIONS: This work provides modeling-level evidence that achieving dietary sodium reduction targets (including specific food category targets) could generate large health gains and cost savings for a national health sector. Demographic groups with the highest cardiovascular disease rates stand to gain most, assisting in reducing health inequalities between sex and ethnic groups.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBMC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleModeling health gains and cost savings for ten dietary salt reduction targets
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12937-016-0161-1
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleNutrition Journal
melbourne.source.volume15
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1077711
melbourne.contributor.authorCOBIAC, LINDA
melbourne.contributor.authorBlakely, Antony
dc.identifier.eissn1475-2891
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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