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dc.contributor.authorWheeler, MJ
dc.contributor.authorDempsey, PC
dc.contributor.authorGrace, MS
dc.contributor.authorEllis, KA
dc.contributor.authorGardiner, PA
dc.contributor.authorGreen, DJ
dc.contributor.authorDunstan, DW
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T01:48:08Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T01:48:08Z
dc.date.issued2017-09
dc.identifierpii: S2352-8737(17)30025-2
dc.identifier.citationWheeler, M. J., Dempsey, P. C., Grace, M. S., Ellis, K. A., Gardiner, P. A., Green, D. J. & Dunstan, D. W. (2017). Sedentary behavior as a risk factor for cognitive decline? A focus on the influence of glycemic control in brain health.. Alzheimers Dement (N Y), 3 (3), pp.291-300. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trci.2017.04.001.
dc.identifier.issn2352-8737
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259480
dc.description.abstractCognitive decline leading to dementia represents a global health burden. In the absence of targeted pharmacotherapy, lifestyle approaches remain the best option for slowing the onset of dementia. However, older adults spend very little time doing moderate to vigorous exercise and spend a majority of time in sedentary behavior. Sedentary behavior has been linked to poor glycemic control and increased risk of all-cause mortality. Here, we explore a potential link between sedentary behavior and brain health. We highlight the role of glycemic control in maintaining brain function and suggest that reducing and replacing sedentary behavior with intermittent light-intensity physical activity may protect against cognitive decline by reducing glycemic variability. Given that older adults find it difficult to achieve current exercise recommendations, this may be an additional practical strategy. However, more research is needed to understand the impact of poor glycemic control on brain function and whether practical interventions aimed at reducing and replacing sedentary behavior with intermittent light intensity physical activity can help slow cognitive decline.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0
dc.titleSedentary behavior as a risk factor for cognitive decline? A focus on the influence of glycemic control in brain health.
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.trci.2017.04.001
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPsychiatry
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of BioSciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyScience
melbourne.source.titleAlzheimer's and Dementia: Translational Research and Clinical Interventions
melbourne.source.volume3
melbourne.source.issue3
melbourne.source.pages291-300
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC-ND
melbourne.elementsid1213654
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5651418
melbourne.contributor.authorEllis, Kathryn
melbourne.contributor.authorWheeler, Michael
dc.identifier.eissn2352-8737
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidBAKER IDI HEART & DIABETES INSTITUTE - DO NOT USE (359192), 1062338
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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