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dc.contributor.authorMilne, GJ
dc.contributor.authorHalder, N
dc.contributor.authorKelso, JK
dc.contributor.authorBarr, IG
dc.contributor.authorMoyes, J
dc.contributor.authorKahn, K
dc.contributor.authorTwine, R
dc.contributor.authorCohen, C
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T02:11:03Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T02:11:03Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-01
dc.identifier.citationMilne, G. J., Halder, N., Kelso, J. K., Barr, I. G., Moyes, J., Kahn, K., Twine, R. & Cohen, C. (2016). Trivalent and quadrivalent influenza vaccination effectiveness in Australia and South Africa: results from a modelling study. INFLUENZA AND OTHER RESPIRATORY VIRUSES, 10 (4), pp.324-332. https://doi.org/10.1111/irv.12367.
dc.identifier.issn1750-2640
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259599
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: A modelling study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of trivalent (TIV) and quadrivalent (QIV) vaccination in South Africa and Australia. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the potential benefits of alternative vaccination strategies which may depend on community-specific demographic and health characteristics. METHODS: Two influenza A and two influenza B strains were simulated using individual-based simulation models representing specific communities in South Africa and Australia over 11 years. Scenarios using TIV or QIV, with alternative prioritisation strategies and vaccine coverage levels, were evaluated using a country-specific health outcomes process. RESULTS: In South Africa, approximately 18% fewer deaths and hospitalisations would be expected to result from the use of QIV compared to TIV over the 11 modelled years (P = 0·031). In Australia, only 2% (P = 0·30) fewer deaths and hospitalisations would result. Vaccinating 2%, 5%, 15% or 20% of the population with TIV using a strategy of prioritising vulnerable age groups, including HIV-positive individuals, resulted in reductions in hospitalisations and mortality of at least 7%, 18%, 57% and 66%, respectively, in both communities. CONCLUSIONS: The degree to which QIV can reduce health burden compared to TIV is strongly dependent on the number of years in which the influenza B lineage in the TIV matches the circulating B lineages. Assuming a moderate level of B cross-strain protection, TIV may be as effective as QIV. The choice of vaccination prioritisation has a greater impact than the QIV/TIV choice, with strategies targeting those most responsible for transmission being most effective.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELL
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleTrivalent and quadrivalent influenza vaccination effectiveness in Australia and South Africa: results from a modelling study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/irv.12367
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMicrobiology and Immunology
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleInfluenza and Other Respiratory Viruses
melbourne.source.volume10
melbourne.source.issue4
melbourne.source.pages324-332
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1219023
melbourne.contributor.authorBarr, Ian
dc.identifier.eissn1750-2659
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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