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dc.contributor.authorKearns, TM
dc.contributor.authorCurrie, BJ
dc.contributor.authorCheng, AC
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, J
dc.contributor.authorCarapetis, JR
dc.contributor.authorHolt, DC
dc.contributor.authorPage, W
dc.contributor.authorShield, J
dc.contributor.authorGundjirryirr, R
dc.contributor.authorMulholland, E
dc.contributor.authorWard, L
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, RM
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T02:14:29Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T02:14:29Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-01
dc.identifierpii: PNTD-D-16-01676
dc.identifier.citationKearns, T. M., Currie, B. J., Cheng, A. C., McCarthy, J., Carapetis, J. R., Holt, D. C., Page, W., Shield, J., Gundjirryirr, R., Mulholland, E., Ward, L. & Andrews, R. M. (2017). Strongyloides seroprevalence before and after an ivermectin mass drug administration in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. PLOS NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASES, 11 (5), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005607.
dc.identifier.issn1935-2735
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259621
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Strongyloides seroprevalence is hyper-endemic in many Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, ranging from 35-60%. We report the impact on Strongyloides seroprevalence after two oral ivermectin mass drug administrations (MDAs) delivered 12 months apart in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. METHODS: Utilizing a before and after study design, we measured Strongyloides seroprevalence through population census with sequential MDAs at baseline and month 12. Surveys at months 6 and 18 determined changes in serostatus. Serodiagnosis was undertaken by ELISA that used sonicated Strongyloides ratti antigen to detect anti-Strongyloides IgG. Non-pregnant participants weighing ≥15 kg were administered a single 200 μg/kg ivermectin dose, repeated after 10-42 days if Strongyloides and/or scabies was diagnosed; others followed a standard alternative algorithm. A questionnaire on clinical symptoms was administered to identify adverse events from treatment and self-reported symptoms associated with serostatus. FINDINGS: We surveyed 1013 participants at the baseline population census and 1060 (n = 700 from baseline cohort and 360 new entrants) at month 12. Strongyloides seroprevalence fell from 21% (175/818) at baseline to 5% at month 6. For participants from the baseline cohort this reduction was sustained at month 12 (34/618, 6%), falling to 2% at month 18 after the second MDA. For new entrants to the cohort at month 12, seroprevalence reduced from 25% (75/297) to 7% at month 18. Strongyloides positive seroconversions for the baseline cohort six months after each MDA were 2.5% (4/157) at month 6 and 1% at month 18, whilst failure to serorevert remained unchanged at 18%. At 12 months, eosinophilia was identified in 59% of baseline seropositive participants and 89% of seropositive new entrants, compared with 47%baseline seronegative participants and 51% seronegative new entrants. Seropositivity was not correlated with haemoglobin or any self-reported clinical symptoms. Clinical symptoms ascertained on the day of treatment and 24-72 hrs after, did not identify any adverse events. SIGNIFICANCE: Two community ivermectin MDAs delivered 12 months apart by trained Aboriginal researchers in collaboration with non-Indigenous researchers resulted in a sustained and significant reduction in Strongyloides seroprevalence over 18 months. Similar reductions were seen in the baseline cohort and new entrants.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleStrongyloides seroprevalence before and after an ivermectin mass drug administration in a remote Australian Aboriginal community
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0005607
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPaediatrics (RCH)
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMicrobiology and Immunology
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titlePLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
melbourne.source.volume11
melbourne.source.issue5
melbourne.source.pagese0005607-
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1220755
melbourne.openaccess.pmchttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5444847
melbourne.contributor.authorCheng, Allen
melbourne.contributor.authorMulholland, Edward
melbourne.contributor.authorMcCarthy, James
dc.identifier.eissn1935-2735
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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