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dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, DA
dc.contributor.authorLim, A
dc.contributor.authorWiles, S
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, SA
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, JT
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T02:19:34Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T02:19:34Z
dc.date.issued2013-08-21
dc.identifierpii: 1471-2334-13-385
dc.identifier.citationWilliamson, D. A., Lim, A., Wiles, S., Roberts, S. A. & Freeman, J. T. (2013). Population-based incidence and comparative demographics of community-associated and healthcare-associated Escherichia coli bloodstream infection in Auckland, New Zealand, 2005-2011. BMC INFECTIOUS DISEASES, 13 (1), https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-13-385.
dc.identifier.issn1471-2334
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259645
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Escherichia coli is a major human pathogen, both in community and healthcare settings. To date however, relatively few studies have defined the population burden of E. coli bloodstream infections. Such information is important in informing strategies around treatment and prevention of these serious infections. Against this background, we performed a retrospective, population-based observational study of all cases of E. coli bacteremia in patients presenting to our hospital between January 2005 and December 2011. METHODS: Auckland District Health Board is a tertiary-level, university-affiliated institution serving a population of approximately 500,000, within a larger metropolitan population of 1.4 million. We identified all patients with an episode of bloodstream infection due to E. coli over the study period. A unique episode was defined as the first positive E. coli blood culture taken from the same patient within a thirty-day period. Standard definitions were used to classify episodes into community- or healthcare-associated E. coli bacteremia. Demographic information was obtained for all patients, including: age; gender; ethnicity; length of stay (days); requirement for intensive care admission and all-cause, in-patient mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1507 patients had a unique episode of E. coli bacteremia over the study period. The overall average annual incidence of E. coli bacteremia was 52 per 100,000 population, and was highest in the under one year and over 65-year age groups. When stratified by ethnicity, rates were highest in Pacific Peoples and Māori (83 and 62 per 100,000 population respectively). The incidence of community-onset E. coli bacteremia increased significantly over the study period. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 9% (135/1507), and was significantly higher in patients who had a hospital-onset E. coli bacteremia. CONCLUSIONS: Our work provides valuable baseline data on the incidence of E. coli bacteremia in our locale. The incidence was higher that that described from other developed countries, with significant demographic variation, most notably in ethnic-specific incidence rates. Future work should assess the possible reasons for this disparity.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBMC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titlePopulation-based incidence and comparative demographics of community-associated and healthcare-associated Escherichia coli bloodstream infection in Auckland, New Zealand, 2005-2011
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2334-13-385
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMicrobiology and Immunology
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleBMC Infectious Diseases
melbourne.source.volume13
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1219121
melbourne.contributor.authorWilliamson, Deborah
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2334
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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