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dc.contributor.authorRusso, PL
dc.contributor.authorChen, G
dc.contributor.authorCheng, AC
dc.contributor.authorRichards, M
dc.contributor.authorGraves, N
dc.contributor.authorRatcliffe, J
dc.contributor.authorHall, L
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-05T00:25:26Z
dc.date.available2021-02-05T00:25:26Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-01
dc.identifierpii: bmjopen-2016-011397
dc.identifier.citationRusso, P. L., Chen, G., Cheng, A. C., Richards, M., Graves, N., Ratcliffe, J. & Hall, L. (2016). Novel application of a discrete choice experiment to identify preferences for a national healthcare-associated infection surveillance programme: a cross-sectional study. BMJ OPEN, 6 (5), https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011397.
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/259998
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To identify key stakeholder preferences and priorities when considering a national healthcare-associated infection (HAI) surveillance programme through the use of a discrete choice experiment (DCE). SETTING: Australia does not have a national HAI surveillance programme. An online web-based DCE was developed and made available to participants in Australia. PARTICIPANTS: A sample of 184 purposively selected healthcare workers based on their senior leadership role in infection prevention in Australia. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: A DCE requiring respondents to select 1 HAI surveillance programme over another based on 5 different characteristics (or attributes) in repeated hypothetical scenarios. Data were analysed using a mixed logit model to evaluate preferences and identify the relative importance of each attribute. RESULTS: A total of 122 participants completed the survey (response rate 66%) over a 5-week period. Excluding 22 who mismatched a duplicate choice scenario, analysis was conducted on 100 responses. The key findings included: 72% of stakeholders exhibited a preference for a surveillance programme with continuous mandatory core components (mean coefficient 0.640 (p<0.01)), 65% for a standard surveillance protocol where patient-level data are collected on infected and non-infected patients (mean coefficient 0.641 (p<0.01)), and 92% for hospital-level data that are publicly reported on a website and not associated with financial penalties (mean coefficient 1.663 (p<0.01)). CONCLUSIONS: The use of the DCE has provided a unique insight to key stakeholder priorities when considering a national HAI surveillance programme. The application of a DCE offers a meaningful method to explore and quantify preferences in this setting.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBMJ PUBLISHING GROUP
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
dc.titleNovel application of a discrete choice experiment to identify preferences for a national healthcare-associated infection surveillance programme: a cross-sectional study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011397
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMicrobiology and Immunology
melbourne.affiliation.departmentInfectious Diseases
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleBMJ Open
melbourne.source.volume6
melbourne.source.issue5
dc.rights.licenseCC BY-NC
melbourne.elementsid1086589
melbourne.contributor.authorRichards, Michael
melbourne.contributor.authorCheng, Allen
dc.identifier.eissn2044-6055
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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