Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWeeks, AR
dc.contributor.authorStoklosa, J
dc.contributor.authorHoffmann, AA
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-05T00:31:50Z
dc.date.available2021-02-05T00:31:50Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-08
dc.identifierpii: 163
dc.identifier.citationWeeks, A. R., Stoklosa, J. & Hoffmann, A. A. (2016). Conservation of genetic uniqueness of populations may increase extinction likelihood of endangered species: the case of Australian mammals. FRONTIERS IN ZOOLOGY, 13 (1), https://doi.org/10.1186/s12983-016-0163-z.
dc.identifier.issn1742-9994
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/260043
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: As increasingly fragmented and isolated populations of threatened species become subjected to climate change, invasive species and other stressors, there is an urgent need to consider adaptive potential when making conservation decisions rather than focussing on past processes. In many cases, populations identified as unique and currently managed separately suffer increased risk of extinction through demographic and genetic processes. Other populations currently not at risk are likely to be on a trajectory where declines in population size and fitness soon appear inevitable. RESULTS: Using datasets from natural Australian mammal populations, we show that drift processes are likely to be driving uniqueness in populations of many threatened species as a result of small population size and fragmentation. Conserving and managing such remnant populations separately will therefore often decrease their adaptive potential and increase species extinction risk. CONCLUSIONS: These results highlight the need for a paradigm shift in conservation biology practise; strategies need to focus on the preservation of genetic diversity at the species level, rather than population, subspecies or evolutionary significant unit. The introduction of new genetic variants into populations through in situ translocation needs to be considered more broadly in conservation programs as a way of decreasing extinction risk by increasing neutral genetic diversity which may increase the adaptive potential of populations if adaptive variation is also increased.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBMC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleConservation of genetic uniqueness of populations may increase extinction likelihood of endangered species: the case of Australian mammals
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12983-016-0163-z
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of BioSciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyScience
melbourne.source.titleFrontiers in Zoology
melbourne.source.volume13
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.identifier.arcDP0988711
melbourne.identifier.arcDP160100661
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1082744
melbourne.contributor.authorWeeks, Andrew
melbourne.contributor.authorHoffmann, Ary
dc.identifier.eissn1742-9994
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidAustralian Research Council, DP0988711
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidAustralian Research Council, DP160100661
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record