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dc.contributor.authorTung, ILY
dc.contributor.authorMachalek, DA
dc.contributor.authorGarland, SM
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-05T00:48:25Z
dc.date.available2021-02-05T00:48:25Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-26
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-16-05953
dc.identifier.citationTung, I. L. Y., Machalek, D. A. & Garland, S. M. (2016). Attitudes, Knowledge and Factors Associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Uptake in Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Victoria, Australia. PLOS ONE, 11 (8), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0161846.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/260158
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination targets high-risk HPV16/18 that cause 70% of all cancers of the cervix. In Australia there is a fully-funded, school-based National HPV Vaccination Program which has achieved vaccine initiation rate of 82% among age-eligible females. Improving HPV vaccination rates is important in the prevention of morbidity and mortality associated with HPV-related disease. This study aimed to identify factors and barriers associated with uptake of the HPV vaccine in the Australian Program. METHODS: Between 2011 and 2014, females aged 18-25 years, living in Victoria, Australia who were offered HPV vaccination between 2007 and 2009 as part of the National HPV Vaccination Program, living in Victoria, Australia were recruited into a a young women's study examining effectiveness of the Australian National HPV Vaccination Program. Overall, 668 participants completed the recruitment survey, which collected data of participants' demographics and HPV knowledge. In 2015 these participants were invited to complete an additional supplementary survey on parental demographics and attitudes towards vaccinations. RESULTS: In 2015, 417 participants completed the supplementary survey (62% response rate). Overall, 19% of participants were unvaccinated. In multivariate analyses, HPV vaccination was significantly associated with their being born in Australia (p<0.001), having completed childhood vaccinations (p<0.001) and their parents being main decision-makers for participants' HPV vaccination (p<0.001). The main reason reported for HPV non-vaccination was parental concern about vaccine safety (43%). Compared with HPV-vaccinated participants, those unvaccinated were significantly more likely to be opposed to all vaccines, including HPV vaccines (p<0.001) and were less likely to consider vaccinating their own children with all vaccines (p = 0.033), including HPV vaccines (p<0.001). Overall, 61% of unvaccinated participants reported that a recommendation from GPs would increase HPV vaccine acceptance. CONCLUSIONS: Attitudes towards general health, vaccinations in general, as well as HPV vaccines are important in HPV vaccine uptake. Long-term monitoring of the knowledge, attitude and beliefs towards HPV vaccination in the community is critical to ensure a continued high uptake of the vaccine and success of the program.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleAttitudes, Knowledge and Factors Associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Uptake in Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Victoria, Australia
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0161846
melbourne.affiliation.departmentObstetrics and Gynaecology
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume11
melbourne.source.issue8
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1094328
melbourne.contributor.authorMachalek, Dorothy
melbourne.contributor.authorWark, Suzanne
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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