Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorScalzo, F
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, DA
dc.contributor.authorOrr, C
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, K
dc.contributor.authorHester, R
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-05T00:49:48Z
dc.date.available2021-02-05T00:49:48Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-26
dc.identifier.citationScalzo, F., O'Connor, D. A., Orr, C., Murphy, K. & Hester, R. (2016). Attention Diversion Improves Response Inhibition of Immediate Reward, But Only When it Is Beneficial: An fMRI Study. FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, 10, https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2016.00429.
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/260168
dc.description.abstractDeficits of self-control are associated with a number of mental state disorders. The ability to direct attention away from an alluring stimulus appears to aid inhibition of an impulsive response. However, further functional imaging research is required to assess the impact of shifts in attention on self-regulating processes. We varied the level of attentional disengagement in an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-based Go/No-go task to probe whether diversion of attention away from alluring stimuli facilitates response inhibition. We used the attention-grabbing characteristic of faces to exogenously direct attention away from stimuli and investigated the relative importance of attention and response inhibition mechanisms under different delayed reward scenarios [i.e., where forgoing an immediate reward ($1) led to a higher ($10) or no payoff in the future]. We found that diverting attention improved response inhibition performance, but only when resistance to an alluring stimulus led to delayed reward. Region of interest analyses indicated significant increased activity in posterior right inferior frontal gyrus during successful No-go trials for delayed reward trials compared to no delayed reward trials, and significant reduction in activity in the superior temporal gyri and left caudate in contexts of high attentional diversion. Our findings imply that strategies that increase the perceived benefits of response inhibition might assist individuals in abstaining from problematic impulsive behaviors.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SA
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleAttention Diversion Improves Response Inhibition of Immediate Reward, But Only When it Is Beneficial: An fMRI Study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2016.00429
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
melbourne.source.volume10
melbourne.identifier.arcDP1092852
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1095021
melbourne.contributor.authorScalzo, Franco
melbourne.contributor.authorHester, Robert
dc.identifier.eissn1662-5161
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidAUST RESEARCH COUNCIL, DP1092852
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record