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dc.contributor.authorInpankaew, T
dc.contributor.authorHii, SF
dc.contributor.authorChimnoi, W
dc.contributor.authorTraub, RJ
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-05T01:24:40Z
dc.date.available2021-02-05T01:24:40Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-10
dc.identifierpii: 10.1186/s13071-016-1552-z
dc.identifier.citationInpankaew, T., Hii, S. F., Chimnoi, W. & Traub, R. J. (2016). Canine vector-borne pathogens in semi-domesticated dogs residing in northern Cambodia. PARASITES & VECTORS, 9 (1), https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-016-1552-z.
dc.identifier.issn1756-3305
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/260388
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: In Southeast Asia, the canine vector-borne pathogens Babesia spp., Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, Hepatozoon canis, haemotropic mycoplasmas and Dirofilaria immitis cause significant morbidity and mortality in dogs. Moreover, dogs have also been implicated as natural reservoirs for Rickettsia felis, the agent of flea-borne spotted fever, increasingly implicated as a cause of undifferentiated fever in humans in Southeast Asia. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and diversity of canine vector-borne pathogens in 101 semi-domesticated dogs from rural Cambodia using molecular diagnostic techniques. RESULTS: The most common canine vector-borne pathogens found infecting dogs in this study were Babesia vogeli (32.7 %) followed by Ehrlichia canis (21.8 %), Dirofilaria immitis (15.8 %), Hepatozoon canis (10.9 %), Mycoplasma haemocanis (9.9 %) and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum" (2.9 %). A high level of co-infection with CVBD agents (23.8 %) was present, most commonly B. vogeli and E. canis. Naturally occurring R. felis infection was also detected in 10.9 % of dogs in support of their role as a natural mammalian reservoir for flea-borne spotted fever in humans. CONCLUSIONS: This study reports for the first time, the prevalence and diversity of CVBD pathogens in dogs in Cambodia. In total, five species of CVBD pathogens were found infecting semi-domesticated dogs and many were co-infected with two or more pathogens. This study supports the role of dogs as natural mammalian reservoirs for R. felis, the agent of flea-borne spotted fever in humans.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBMC
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleCanine vector-borne pathogens in semi-domesticated dogs residing in northern Cambodia
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13071-016-1552-z
melbourne.affiliation.departmentVeterinary Biosciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyVeterinary and Agricultural Sciences
melbourne.source.titleParasites and Vectors
melbourne.source.volume9
melbourne.source.issue1
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1061926
melbourne.contributor.authorTraub, Rebecca
melbourne.contributor.authorINPANKAEW, TAWIN
melbourne.contributor.authorHii, Sze Fui
dc.identifier.eissn1756-3305
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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