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dc.contributor.authorGussy, M
dc.contributor.authorAshbolt, R
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, L
dc.contributor.authorVirgo-Milton, M
dc.contributor.authorCalache, H
dc.contributor.authorDashper, S
dc.contributor.authorLeong, P
dc.contributor.authorde Silva, A
dc.contributor.authorde Livera, A
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, J
dc.contributor.authorWaters, E
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-05T01:27:12Z
dc.date.available2021-02-05T01:27:12Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-01
dc.identifier.citationGussy, M., Ashbolt, R., Carpenter, L., Virgo-Milton, M., Calache, H., Dashper, S., Leong, P., de Silva, A., de Livera, A., Simpson, J. & Waters, E. (2016). Natural history of dental caries in very young Australian children. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRIC DENTISTRY, 26 (3), pp.173-183. https://doi.org/10.1111/ipd.12169.
dc.identifier.issn0960-7439
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/260403
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Whilst the global burden of caries is increasing, the trajectory of decay in young children and the point at which prevention should occur has not been well established. AIM: To identify the 'natural history' of dental caries in early childhood. DESIGN: A birth cohort study was established with 467 mother/child dyads followed at 1, 6, 12, 18, and 36 months of age. Parent-completed surveys captured demographic, social, and behavioural data, and oral examinations provided clinical and data. RESULTS: Eight per cent of children (95% confidence interval (CI): 5-12%) at 18 months and 23% (95% CI: 18-28%) at 36 months experienced decay. Interesting lesion behaviour was found between 18 and 36 months, with rapid development of new lesions on sound teeth (70% of teeth, 95% CI: 63-76%) and regression of many lesions from non-cavitated lesions to sound (23% of teeth, 95% CI: 17-30%). Significant associations were found between soft drink consumption and lesion progression. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest optimal time periods for screening and prevention of a disease which significantly impacts multiple health and well-being outcomes across the life course.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleNatural history of dental caries in very young Australian children
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ipd.12169
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Dental School
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Population and Global Health
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleInternational Journal of Paediatric Dentistry
melbourne.source.volume26
melbourne.source.issue3
melbourne.source.pages173-183
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid977452
melbourne.contributor.authorCarpenter, Lauren
melbourne.contributor.authorDashper, Stuart
melbourne.contributor.authorSimpson, Julie
melbourne.contributor.authorde Silva, Andrea
melbourne.contributor.authorGussy, Mark
melbourne.contributor.authorASHBOLT, ROSEMARY
melbourne.contributor.authorVIRGO-MILTON, MONICA
melbourne.contributor.authorde Livera, Alysha
melbourne.contributor.authorCalache, Hanny
dc.identifier.eissn1365-263X
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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