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dc.contributor.authorBattaglini, E
dc.contributor.authorLiddell, B
dc.contributor.authorDas, P
dc.contributor.authorMalhi, G
dc.contributor.authorFelmingham, K
dc.contributor.authorBryant, RA
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-12T00:23:20Z
dc.date.available2021-02-12T00:23:20Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-29
dc.identifierpii: PONE-D-14-43008
dc.identifier.citationBattaglini, E., Liddell, B., Das, P., Malhi, G., Felmingham, K. & Bryant, R. A. (2016). Intrusive Memories of Distressing Information: An fMRI Study. PLOS ONE, 11 (9), https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0140871.
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/260575
dc.description.abstractAlthough intrusive memories are characteristic of many psychological disorders, the neurobiological underpinning of these involuntary recollections are largely unknown. In this study we used functional magentic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify the neural networks associated with encoding of negative stimuli that are subsequently experienced as intrusive memories. Healthy partipants (N = 42) viewed negative and neutral images during a visual/verbal processing task in an fMRI context. Two days later they were assessed on the Impact of Event Scale for occurrence of intrusive memories of the encoded images. A sub-group of participants who reported significant intrusions (n = 13) demonstrated stronger activation in the amygdala, bilateral ACC and parahippocampal gyrus during verbal encoding relative to a group who reported no intrusions (n = 13). Within-group analyses also revealed that the high intrusion group showed greater activity in the dorsomedial (dmPFC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), inferior frontal gyrus and occipital regions during negative verbal processing compared to neutral verbal processing. These results do not accord with models of intrusions that emphasise visual processing of information at encoding but are consistent with models that highlight the role of inhibitory and suppression processes in the formation of subsequent intrusive memories.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titleIntrusive Memories of Distressing Information: An fMRI Study
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0140871
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPsychiatry
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School of Psychological Sciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titlePLoS One
melbourne.source.volume11
melbourne.source.issue9
melbourne.identifier.nhmrcAPP1073041
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1114007
melbourne.contributor.authorFelmingham, Kim
melbourne.contributor.authorBryant, Richard
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
melbourne.identifier.fundernameidNHMRC, APP1073041
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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