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dc.contributor.authorSilins, SL
dc.contributor.authorSherritt, MA
dc.contributor.authorSilleri, JM
dc.contributor.authorCross, SM
dc.contributor.authorElliott, SL
dc.contributor.authorBharadwaj, M
dc.contributor.authorLe, TTT
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, LE
dc.contributor.authorKhanna, R
dc.contributor.authorMoss, DJ
dc.contributor.authorSuhrbier, A
dc.contributor.authorMisko, LS
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:21:11Z
dc.date.issued2001-12-15
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000172604700031&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1c
dc.identifier.citationSilins, S. L., Sherritt, M. A., Silleri, J. M., Cross, S. M., Elliott, S. L., Bharadwaj, M., Le, T. T. T., Morrison, L. E., Khanna, R., Moss, D. J., Suhrbier, A. & Misko, L. S. (2001). Asymptomatic primary Epstein-Barr virus infection occurs in the absence of blood T-cell repertoire perturbations despite high levels of systemic viral load. BLOOD, 98 (13), pp.3739-3744. https://doi.org/10.1182/blood.V98.13.3739.
dc.identifier.issn0006-4971
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/26152
dc.descriptionC1 - Journal Articles Refereed
dc.description.abstractPrimary infection with the human herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), may result in subclinical seroconversion or may appear as infectious mononucleosis (IM), a lymphoproliferative disease of variable severity. Why primary infection manifests differently between patients is unknown, and, given the difficulties in identifying donors undergoing silent seroconversion, little information has been reported. However, a longstanding assumption has been held that IM represents an exaggerated form of the virologic and immunologic events of asymptomatic infection. T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoires of a unique cohort of subclinically infected patients undergoing silent infection were studied, and the results highlight a fundamental difference between the 2 forms of infection. In contrast to the massive T-cell expansions mobilized during the acute symptomatic phase of IM, asymptomatic donors largely maintain homeostatic T-cell control and peripheral blood repertoire diversity. This disparity cannot simply be linked to severity or spread of the infection because high levels of EBV DNA were found in the blood from both types of acute infection. The results suggest that large expansions of T cells within the blood during IM may not always be associated with the control of primary EBV infection and that they may represent an overreaction that exacerbates disease.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAMER SOC HEMATOLOGY
dc.subjectCellular Immunology; Immune System and Allergy
dc.titleAsymptomatic primary Epstein-Barr virus infection occurs in the absence of blood T-cell repertoire perturbations despite high levels of systemic viral load
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1182/blood.V98.13.3739
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMicrobiology And Immunology
melbourne.source.titleBLOOD
melbourne.source.volume98
melbourne.source.issue13
melbourne.source.pages3739-3744
dc.research.coderfcd320202
dc.research.codeseo1998730102
melbourne.publicationid62378
melbourne.elementsid283886
melbourne.contributor.authorBharadwaj, Mandvi
dc.identifier.eissn1528-0020
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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