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dc.contributor.authorBarone-Nugent, ED
dc.contributor.authorBarty, A
dc.contributor.authorNugent, KA
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:26:16Z
dc.date.issued2002-06-01
dc.identifierpii: 1027
dc.identifier.citationBarone-Nugent, E. D., Barty, A. & Nugent, K. A. (2002). Quantitative phase-amplitude microscopy I: optical microscopy. JOURNAL OF MICROSCOPY-OXFORD, 206 (Pt 3), pp.194-203. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2818.2002.01027.x.
dc.identifier.issn0022-2720
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/26284
dc.descriptionC1 - Journal Articles Refereed
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, the application of a new optical microscopy method (quantitative phase-amplitude microscopy) to biological imaging is explored, and the issue of resolution and image quality is examined. The paper begins by presenting a theoretical analysis of the method using the optical transfer function formalism of Streibl (1985). The effect of coherence on the formation of the phase image is explored, and it is shown that the resolution of the method is not compromised over that of a conventional bright-field image. It is shown that the signal-to-noise ratio of the phase recovery, however, does depend on the degree of coherence in the illumination. Streibl (1985) notes that partially coherent image formation is a non-linear process because of the intermingling of amplitude and phase information. The work presented here shows that the quantitative phase-amplitude microscopy method acts to linearize the image formation process, and that the phase and amplitude information is properly described using a transfer function analysis. The theoretical conclusions are tested experimentally using an optical microscope and the theoretical deductions are confirmed. Samples for microscopy influence both the phase and amplitude of the light wave and it is demonstrated that the new phase recovery method can separate the amplitude and phase information, something not possible using traditional phase microscopy. In the case of a coherent wave, knowledge of the phase and amplitude constitutes complete information that can be used to emulate other forms of microscopy. This capacity is demonstrated by recovering the phase of a sample and using the data to emulate a differential interference contrast image.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherBLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD
dc.subjectAtomic and Molecular Physics ; Physical Sciences
dc.titleQuantitative phase-amplitude microscopy I: optical microscopy
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2818.2002.01027.x
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPhysics
melbourne.source.titleJOURNAL OF MICROSCOPY-OXFORD
melbourne.source.volume206
melbourne.source.issuePt 3
melbourne.source.pages194-203
melbourne.publicationid9009
melbourne.elementsid251435
melbourne.contributor.authorNugent, Keith
melbourne.contributor.authorBarone-Nugent, Eroia
melbourne.contributor.authorBARTY, ANTON
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2818
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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