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dc.contributor.authorBlack, R. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWalters, C. W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T19:49:44Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:49:44Z
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.identifier.citationBlack, R. C., Clark, G. M., & Walters, C. W. (1982). Distribution of electrically stimulated nerve fibres in the cat cochlea. In Proceedings of the Australian Physiological and Pharmacological Society.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/26807
dc.description.abstractAn implant electrode array for a cochlear hearing prosthesis has been developed with mechanical properties which allow atraumatic implantation into the human scala tympani. It consists of small platinum electrode bands welded around a flexible silicon rubber tube (Clark et al, 1979). The present study examines the properites of this electrode in electrically simulating the auidtory nerve. The electrode was inserted through the round window for a distance of 5-6mm into the scala tympani of the cat. Brainstem evoked responses and those from the round window were recorded when stimulating with square biphasic current pulses (0.1 msec/phase). Since there was usually less than 10-20 dB hearing loss in the implanted ear, it was possible to selectively mask components of these responses with high-pass filtered noise. The noise masked the response component arising from fibres in the cochlear region corresponding to the noise band. Responses were recorded in the presence of noise with different cut-off frequencies F1, F2 therefore yielded a response band-limited to the region f1-2. In this way it was possible to measure the amount of electrically stimulated activity in a number of different frequency bands. This technique is identical to that of derived response audiometry using acoustic stimulation. The input-output characteristics of the cochlea to a variety of acoustic transients were measured to exclude the possibility of either electrophonic hearing or altered basilar membrane characteristics contaminating the results. The figure shows the distributions of excited fibres using an electrode with an extended ground system running longitudinally in the cochlea. They were measure as the amplitude of the band-limited responses. Results were similar for bipolar electrodes and these electrodes are thus equally suitable for our present cochlear implant prosthesis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.2, 1978-1983, no.117en_US
dc.subjectotolaryngologyen_US
dc.subjectelectrode arrayen_US
dc.subjectcochlear implanten_US
dc.subjectelectrical stimulationen_US
dc.titleDistribution of electrically stimulated nerve fibres in the cat cochleaen_US
dc.typeConference Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleProceedings of the Australian Physiological and Pharmacological Societyen_US
melbourne.source.volume13en_US
melbourne.source.pages148Pen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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