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dc.contributor.authorDowell, R. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, A. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, R. Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T19:50:04Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:50:04Z
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.identifier881670766en_US
dc.identifier.citationDowell, R. C., Brown, A. M., Shepherd, R. K., & Clark, G. M. (1985). Patient results for a multiple-channel cochlear prosthesis. In Cochlear implants (10th Anniversary Conference on Cochlear Implants), San Francisco.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/26814
dc.description.abstractSix patients implanted with multiple-channel cochlear prostheses and using take-home, wearable speech processors, were assessed three months postoperatively using the Minimal Auditory Capabilities (MAC) battery. Results showed statistically significant improvement on virtually all tests over their preoperative performance with a hearing aid. Four patients showed significant results for open set speech testing. Lipreading tests, using word and sentence material, showed significant improvement for all patients when the cochlear prosthesis was used with lipreading compared to lipreading alone. All the above tests were carried out without training with recorded material of an unfamiliar speaker. Improvements in communication speed of 55% to 126% over lipreading alone were obtained for the six patients as assessed by the speech tracking procedure. These results are for scores averaged over eight sessions of tracking with the two conditions (with and without cochlear prosthesis). The order of conditions was alternated at each session to control practice effects. The wearable speech processor is used all day every day by five patients, and four hours a day by one patient. Reported benefit is not only for communication but also for the recognition of environmental sounds. Four patients have attempted using the telephone with some success in a restricted context situation. One patient uses the telephone routinely without using any special coding strategies. Reported problems with the cochlear prosthesis are primarily related to background noise. Results for these six patients are consistent with those obtained for two patients implanted with a prototype multiple-channel prosthesis in 1978-1979.en_US
dc.publisherRaven Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.3, 1984-1986, no.175en_US
dc.subjectmultiple-channel cochlear prosthesesen_US
dc.subjectMinimal Auditory Capabilities (MAC)en_US
dc.titlePatient results for a multiple-channel cochlear prosthesisen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
melbourne.source.titleCochlear implants (10th Anniversary Conference on Cochlear Implants)en_US
melbourne.source.month22-24 Juneen_US
melbourne.source.pages421-431en_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceSan Franciscoen_US
melbourne.source.editorSchindler, R. A.en_US
melbourne.source.editorMerzenich, M. Men_US
dc.description.sourcedateconference22-24 June 1983en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorSeligman, Peter
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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