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dc.contributor.authorDowell, Richard C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T19:53:10Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:53:10Z
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationDowell, R. C., Blamey, P. J., & Clark, G. M. (1992). Factors affecting speech perceptual performance for children using the 22-electrode cochlear prosthesis [Abstract]. In First European Symposium on Paediatric Cochlear Implantation, Nottingham.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/26875
dc.description.abstractSpeech perception results for all 40 children and adolescents implanted with the. Nucleus 22 electrode cochlear prosthesis in Melbourne (as of February 1, 1992) were used to categorize performance for each child into one of six hierarchical groups: 1: detection of speech including high frequencies 2: discrimination of suprasegmental features of speech in addition to 1,3: discrimination and recognition of .vowel sounds in addition to 1 and 2,.4: discrimination arid recognition of consonant sounds in addition to 1, 2 and 3,5: open set speech. recognition with scores less than 20% for unfamiliar material in addition to 1 to 4,6: open set speech recognition with scores greater than 20% for unfamiliar material in addition to 1 to 5, above.All children demonstrated discrimination of suprasegmentals (level 2) and 58% demonstrated some openset speech recognition (levels 5 and 6). The pattern of results suggested that children who can discriminate segmental features of speech tend to achieve open set speech perception after adequate experience with the prosthesis. The performance level, described above, was used as the dependent variable in a multiple regression analysis to assess the effect of various factors on speech perception performance. The duration of profound hearing impairment and the amount of experience with the prosthesis were shown to contribute significantly to the variance, in performance level. A weaker trend was evident (or recently implanted children which may suggest that those' in oral/aural educational settings progress more rapidly, in terms of speech perception, than those in total communication settings. Age at implantation, cause of deafness, hearing levels prior to implantation, and number of electrodes in use, did not contribute significantly. to the variance in speech perception performance for these children. The results showed that all children with less than seven years of profound hearing impairment and with over one year of experience with the prosthesis have achieved some open-set speech recognition. This is an encouraging result as the trend in clinical application of cochlear prostheses has been towards implanting younger children in recent years. If this sample of hearing-impaired children in Melbourne is representative of the general population, we may expect that most implanted young children will ,develop reasonable speech perception skills after adequate experience and training.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol. 6, 1991-1992 no. 482en_US
dc.subjectotologyen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.subjectcochlear implanten_US
dc.subjectpaediatric otologyen_US
dc.titleFactors affecting speech perceptual performance for children using the 22-electrode cochlear prosthesis [Abstract]en_US
dc.typeConference Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleFirst European Symposium on Paediatric Cochlear Implantationen_US
melbourne.source.month24-27 Septemberen_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceNottinghamen_US
dc.description.sourcedateconference24-27 Septemberen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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