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dc.contributor.authorDowell, Richard C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDooley, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcDermott, H. D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlamey, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKay, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T19:53:13Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:53:13Z
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationDowell, R. C., Dooley, G., McDermott, H. D., Blamey, P., McKay, C., & Clark, G. M. (1992). Future developments in speech processing for multichannel cochlear implants in children [Abstract]. In First European Symposium on Paediatric Cochlear Implantation, Nottingham.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/26876
dc.description.abstractThe average speech perception score for adult implant patients is now about 60% on an open-set sentence test without lipreading. This is higher than the scores obtained by many profound and severe-to-profoundly impaired hearing aid users. This suggests that some hearing aid users, particularly those who use a hearing aid in one ear only, could benefit from a cochlear implant. As neither the implant nor the hearing aid will provide perfect speech recognition it is to be expected that this group should obtain maximum benefit by using the hearing aid in one ear together with the implant in the other ear. However, experience with this group of patients has shown that many people find the use of two independent devices unacceptable. Furthermore, perceptual interaction of the acoustic and electrical signals makes it desirable to be able to control the two outputs in a more co-ordinated way than is possible with two independent devices. Consequently, a "bimodal" speech processor has been developed with both acoustic and electrical outputs controlled from the same speech processing unit. Feature coding aspects of the implant processing have been applied to the acoustic signal in such a way as to enhance speech perception with the hearing aid and improve compatibility with the implant. Initial testing with the bimodal aid shows promise to help severely-to-profoundly impaired individuals. The device has also been useful as a research tool to investigate the complex interactions of simultaneous acoustic and electrical stimulation. The Spectral Maxima Sound Processor (SMSP) has also been developed at the University of Melbourne for use with the Nucleus cochlear implant. Studies with adult subjects have shown improved perception of vowels, consonants, words and sentences in quiet and sentences in background noise with the SMSP as compared with the MSP(MULTIPEAK) which is currently supplied for use with this implant. Results for four subjects showed mean scores for open set sentences at a 10 dB signal-to-noise ratio of 78.7% for the SMSP and 50.0% for the MSP. Mean scores for the same group on open set monosyllabic words in quiet were 57.4% for SMSP and 39.9% for MSP. These results suggest that future improvements in speech perception will be possible for children using the Nucleus cochlear implant.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol. 6, 1991-1992 no. 534en_US
dc.subjectotologyen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.subjectcochlear implanten_US
dc.subjectpaediatric otologyen_US
dc.titleFuture developments in speech processing for multichannel cochlear implants in children [Abstract]en_US
dc.typeConference Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleFirst European Symposium on Paediatric Cochlear Implantationen_US
melbourne.source.month24-27 Septemberen_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceNottinghamen_US
dc.description.sourcedateconference24-27 Septemberen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorMcKay, Colette
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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