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dc.contributor.authorShepherd, R. K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T19:54:59Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:54:59Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationShepherd, R. K., Xu, J., & Clark, G. M. (1994). Physiological and histopathological response of the cochlea to chronic electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve at high stimulus rates [Abstract]. In Second European Conference on Paediatric Cochlear Implants, Montpellier, France.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/26910
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has shown that chronic electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve using charge balanced biphasic current pulses at rates of up to 500 pulses per second (pps) does not adversely affect the adjacent spiral ganglion population. More recently, a number of clinical trials have suggested that speech processing strategies based on high pulse rates (e.g. 1000 pps), can further improve speech perception. In the present study we evaluated the physiological and histopathological response of the cochlea following long-term stimulation using rates of 1000 pps. Thirteen normal hearing cats were bilaterally implanted with scala tympani electrodes and unilaterally stimulated using 25-50 �s per phase charge balanced biphasic current pulses presented at 1000 pps. Additional charge balance was achieved by shorting the electrodes between current pulses. Each animal was stimulated for periods ranging from 700 - 2100 hours at current levels within its dynamic range. Auditory brainstem responses to both acoustic (ABR) and electrical (EABR) stimuli were periodically recorded throughout the chronic stimulation program. At completion of the program the cochleas were prepared for histological examination. While all animals exhibited an increase in acoustic thresholds following surgery, click evoked ABR's returned to near normal levels in half the animals. Frequency specific stimuli indicated that the most extensive hearing loss occurred adjacent to the array (>12 kHz) while lower frequency thresholds appeared at or near normal Our EABR data showed that the majority of animals exhibited slight increases in threshold, although response amplitudes remained very stable for the duration of the stimulus program. The physiological data reported here will be correlated with cochlear histopathology. These initial findings suggest that chronic intracochlear electrical stimulation at high pulse rates, using a carefully designed charge balanced stimulator, does not appear to adversely affect the implanted cochlea.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.8, 1994-1995, no.702en_US
dc.subjectcochlea responseen_US
dc.subjectelectrical stimulationen_US
dc.subjectauditory nerveen_US
dc.subjectspeech processingen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.subjectcaten_US
dc.subjectscala tympanien_US
dc.subjectelectrodesen_US
dc.subjectacoustic stimulien_US
dc.subjectelectrical stimulien_US
dc.subjectdeafnessen_US
dc.titlePhysiological and histopathological response of the cochlea to chronic electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve at high stimulus rates [Abstract]en_US
dc.typeConference Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleSecond European Conference on Paediatric Cochlear Implantsen_US
melbourne.source.monthMayen_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceMontpellier, Franceen_US
dc.description.sourcedateconferenceMayen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorShepherd, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorXu, Jin
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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