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dc.contributor.authorHollow, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRance, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDowell, R.C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPyman, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCowan, R. S. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGalvin, K. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarker, E. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSarant, J. Z.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDettman, S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T19:55:44Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:55:44Z
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationClark, G. M., Cowan, R. S. C., Galvin, K. L., Barker, E. J., Sarant, J. Z., Dettman, S., et al. (1995). Speech perception benefits for implanted children with preoperative residual hearing [Abstract]. In Abstracts of 3rd International Congress on Cochlear Implant, Paris.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/26924
dc.description.abstractSince the implantation of the first children with the Nucleus 22-channel cochlear prosthesis in Melbourne in 1985, there has been rapid expansion in the number of implanted children world-wide. Improved surgical technique and experience in paediatric assessment and management have contributed to a trend to implant very young children. At the same time there has also been continuing development of improved speech processing strategies resulting in greater speech perception benefits. In the Melbourne program, over 60% of children obtain significant scores on open-set word and sentence tests using their cochlear implant alone without the aid of lipreading. As parents and professionals have become aware of these improved benefits to speech perception benefits in profoundly deaf children, there have been requests to consider implanting severely-to-profoundly deaf children. In these children with higher levels of residual hearing, only those children with poorer-than-expected performance on speech perception tests using hearing aids have been considered for surgery. A number of such cases have now been implanted in the Melbourne program. The speech perception benefits for this group are reported and are being compared with benefits for the profoundly deaf group of children.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.8, 1994-1995, no.843en_US
dc.subjectotolaryngologyen_US
dc.subjectcochlear implanten_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectresidual hearingen_US
dc.subjectUniversity of Melbourneen_US
dc.subjectAustralian Bionic Ear and Hearing Research Instituteen_US
dc.subjectRoyal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospitalen_US
dc.subjectMelbourneen_US
dc.subjectdeafnessen_US
dc.titleSpeech perception benefits for implanted children with preoperative residual hearing [Abstract]en_US
dc.typeConference Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleAbstracts of 3rd International Congress on Cochlear Implanten_US
melbourne.source.pages376en_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceParisen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorCowan, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorBARKER, ELIZABETH
melbourne.contributor.authorHOLLOW, RODNEY
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.contributor.authorDettman, Shani
melbourne.contributor.authorGalvin, Karyn
melbourne.contributor.authorRance, Gary
melbourne.contributor.authorPYMAN, BRIAN
melbourne.contributor.authorSarant, Julia
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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