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dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDowell, Richard C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCowan, Robert S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPyman, Brian C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Robert L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T19:56:29Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:56:29Z
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationClark, G. M., Dowell, R. C., Cowan, R. S., Pyman, B. C., & Webb, R. L. (1996). Multicenter evaluations of speech perception in adults and children with the nucleus (cochlear) 22-channel cochlear implant. In Transplants and implants on otology III. (Third International Symposium on Transplants and Implants in Otology. Bordeaux, France, 10-14 June 1995), Bordeaux, France.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/26938
dc.description.abstractThe Nucleus 22-channel cochlear implant has been implanted in over 10,500 patients in 79 countries. and used for more than 25 languages. It arose as a result of our early physiological, behavioral and biological research on experimental animals. The historical development of the Nucleus device has been outlined in detail by Clark. Our ongoing research has led to improvements in the way speech is processed with the 22-channel device that are now resulting in improved speech perception for profoundly totally deaf people that is, on average, better than the speech perception obtained by many deaf people with hearing aids. The multiple-channel cochlear implant was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in postlinguistically deaf adults in 1985. It was subsequently approved for use in children in 1990. The proportion of children (18 years of age and under) to have now received it is approximately 439C (4,500 out of 10.500). In evaluating improvements in speech processing it is important to design well-controlled studies, and a number of important ones which have previously been published are summarized in this paper. In addition, speech perception results for all the Nucleus speech processing strategies have been obtained four to six months postoperatively from unselected patients presenting to the Cochlear Implant Clinic at the Royal Victorian Eye & Ear Hospital (RVEEH), Melbourne, and are presented in this paper. As results can vary greatly with different durations of experience it is essential to make comparisons at the same time postoperatively. These clinical data are the most complete to date for comparing the Nucleus speech processing strategies.en_US
dc.publisherKugleren_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.9, 1995-1996, no.829en_US
dc.subjectNucleus 22-channel cochlear implanten_US
dc.subjectotolaryngologyen_US
dc.subjectotologyen_US
dc.titleMulticenter evaluations of speech perception in adults and children with the nucleus (cochlear) 22-channel cochlear implanten_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
melbourne.source.titleTransplants and implants on otology III. (Third International Symposium on Transplants and Implants in Otology. Bordeaux, France, 10-14 June 1995)en_US
melbourne.source.month10-14 Juneen_US
melbourne.source.pages353-363en_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceBordeaux, Franceen_US
melbourne.source.editorPortmann, M.en_US
dc.description.sourcedateconference10-14 Juneen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.contributor.authorCowan, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorPYMAN, BRIAN
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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