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dc.contributor.authorTykocinski, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, R. K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T19:57:43Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:57:43Z
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationTykocinski, M., Shepherd, R. K., & Clark, G. M. (1995). Decrement in auditory nerve function following acute high rate stimulation in guinea pigs [Abstract]. In Abstracts book of 3rd International Congress on Cochlear Implants (Paris, 27-29 April 1995), Paris, France.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/26960
dc.description.abstractCochlear implants have been shown to successfully provide profoundly deaf patients with auditory cues for speech discrimination. Psychophysical studies suggested that speech processing strategies based on stimulus rates of up to 1000 pulses per second (pps) may lead to an improvement in speech perception, due to a better representation of the rapid variations in the amplitude of speech. However, "neural fatigue" has been known to occur following brief periods of electrical stimulation at rates high enough to ensure that stimuli occur within the neurons relative refractory period, and has been shown to depend on stimulus duration and rate of the evoked neural activity. Prolonged electrical stimulation at these high stimulus rates could, therefore, have an adverse effect on the neurons metabolism and result in cellular energy depletion.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.9, 1995-1996, no.844en_US
dc.subjectcochlear implantsen_US
dc.subjectotolaryngologyen_US
dc.subjectotologyen_US
dc.titleDecrement in auditory nerve function following acute high rate stimulation in guinea pigs [Abstract]en_US
dc.typeConference Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleAbstracts book of 3rd International Congress on Cochlear Implants (Paris, 27-29 April 1995)en_US
melbourne.source.month27-29 Aprilen_US
melbourne.source.pages156en_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceParis, Franceen_US
dc.description.sourcedateconference27-29 Aprilen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorShepherd, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorTYKOCINSKI, MICHAEL
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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