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dc.contributor.authorMarzella, P. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, R. K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBartlett, P. F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKilpatrick, T. J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T19:59:40Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T19:59:40Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationMarzella, P. L., Clark, G. M., Shepherd, R. K., Bartlett, P. F., & Kilpatrick, T. J. (1997). Increased survival of auditory neurones treated with LIF. In Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society, Newcastle.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/26996
dc.descriptionThis is an abstract of a paper from Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society 1997 published by Australian Neuroscience Society. This version is reproduced with the permission of publisher.en_US
dc.description.abstractDegeneration of spiral ganglion cells (SOC) is one of the most common correlates of sensorineural hearing loss (1). Several lines of evidence show that the continued supply of growth factors is responsible for maintaining auditory neurone integrity (2). In the present study SOC cultures were used as a model of auditory innervation to test the ability of the cytokine leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and the neurotrophin NT -3 to promote neuronal survival individually or in combination. The data demonstrate that LIF promotes the survival of SOC in a concentration-dependent manner, with a significant increase in neuronal survival at concentrations as low as 0.1 ng/ml compared to untreated wells ( p< 0.05), and a maximum neuronal survival at 10 ng/ml. In addition, when used in combination LIF and NT-3 were more effective in promoting neuronal survival than either factor individually, with a significant increase in survival at concentrations of 0.1ng mI[to the power of]-1/0.1 ng mI[to the power of]-1 (LIF/NT-3). To our knowledge this is the first study reporting that LIF has trophic activity on SOC. Moreover, the data suggest that a combination of several growth factors may provide a better approach when developing pharmacological therapies for auditory neuron repair.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.10, 1997, no. 1073en_US
dc.subjectotolaryngologyen_US
dc.subjectotologyen_US
dc.subjectcochlear implantsen_US
dc.subjectspiral ganglion cellsen_US
dc.subjectneuronal survivalen_US
dc.titleIncreased survival of auditory neurones treated with LIFen_US
dc.typeConference Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleProceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Societyen_US
melbourne.source.month2-7 Februaryen_US
melbourne.source.volume8en_US
melbourne.source.pages168en_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceNewcastleen_US
dc.description.sourcedateconference2-7 Februaryen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorMARZELLA, PHILLIP
melbourne.contributor.authorShepherd, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorKilpatrick, Trevor
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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