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dc.contributor.authorTykocinski, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLinahan, N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, Robert K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:00:45Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:00:45Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationTykocinski, M., Linahan, N., Shepherd, R. K., & Clark, G. M. (1998). Electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve: chronic monopolar stimulation using very high stimulus rates [Abstract]. In Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (18th Annual Australian Neuroscience Meeting), Canberra, A.C.T.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27015
dc.descriptionAbstract of Poster 137en_US
dc.descriptionThis is an abstract of a poster presentation from the Proceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society 1998. This version is reproduced with the permission of the publisher.en_US
dc.description.abstractSpeech processing strategies based on high rate electrical stimulation have been associated with recent improvements of speech perception among cochlear implant users. In the present study we investigated the effects of chronic monopolar stimulation using very high rates (14493 pulses\s). Under general anaesthesia (ketamine (20 mg/kg) and xylazine (3.8 mg/kg) i.p.) six normal hearing cats were implanted bilaterally with a three channel platinum (Pt) scala tympani electrode array, while a return Pt-electrode was placed outside the bulla. Chronic electrical stimulation using charge-balanced biphasic current pulses was delivered unilaterally via a transcutaneous leadwire connected to a backpack-stimulator for up to 2000 h. The animals hearing status was periodically monitored using acoustically evoked compound action potentials (CAP's) and brainstem responses (ABR's). In addition the electrically evoked ABR (EABR) was also recorded to ensure that the chronic stimulus was above threshold. Stimulus current and electrode voltage waveforms were monitored twice daily and access resistance (Ra) and electrode impedance (Zc) calculated. ABR and CAP thresholds were elevated immediately following implantation, but generally showed evidence of partial recovery (0-40 dB). Further deterioration of thresholds on the stimulated side (10-30 dB) was subsequently observed, while control-thresholds remained more stable. Ra (1.3-1.8 kΩ) and Zc (2.2-3.8Ω) typically increased in the first few weeks of electrical stimulation up to Ra:5.6 kΩ and Zc:8.1 kΩ, before decreasing slightly to a constant plateau. These initial results indicate changes in the electrode-tissue interface and tissue growth within the cochlea. They also indicate that chronic stimulation at these high rates may decrease residual hearing.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.11, 1998-1999, no.1139en_US
dc.subjectotolaryngologyen_US
dc.subjectspeech processingen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.subjectcochlear implantsen_US
dc.titleElectrical stimulation of the auditory nerve: chronic monopolar stimulation using very high stimulus rates [Abstract]en_US
dc.typeConference Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleProceedings of the Australian Neuroscience Society (18th Annual Australian Neuroscience Meeting. Canberra, 27-30 January 1998)en_US
melbourne.source.month27-30 Januaryen_US
melbourne.source.volume9en_US
melbourne.source.pages163en_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceCanberra, A.C.T.en_US
dc.description.sourcedateconference27-30 Januaryen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorShepherd, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorTYKOCINSKI, MICHAEL
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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