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dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:06:04Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:06:04Z
dc.date.issued1969en_US
dc.identifier.citationClark, G. M. (1969). The evolution and function of the middle ear in man. Journal of the Otolaryngological Society of Australia, March, 2(4), 21-27.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27108
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in the Journal of the Otolaryngological Society of Australia 1969. This version is reproduced with permission from the Otolaryngological Society of Australia.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the animal kingdom there is a great variety of middle and inner ears. This suggests that these variations in structure are either due to the hearing requirements of the animal, or alternatively they are not essential to the problem of hearing. For example, why do we need three bones in the middle ear when a bird only has one? To answer these questions it is helpful to examine the evolution of the auditory system.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.1, 1967-1977, no.16en_US
dc.subjectmiddle ear in manen_US
dc.titleThe evolution and function of the middle ear in manen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
melbourne.source.titleJournal of the Otolaryngological Society of Australiaen_US
melbourne.source.monthMarchen_US
melbourne.source.volume2en_US
melbourne.source.issue4en_US
melbourne.source.pages21-27en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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