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dc.contributor.authorCowan, R. S. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDowell, R. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPyman, B. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDettman, S. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDawson, P. W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRance, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarker, E. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSarant, J. Z.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:18:28Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:18:28Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationCowan, R. S. C., Dowell, R. C., Pyman, B. C., Dettman, S. J., Dawson, P. W., Rance, G., et al. (1993). Preliminary speech perception results for children with the 22-electrode Melbourne/ cochlear hearing prosthesis. In C. R. Pfaltz (Ed.), Cochlear implants: new perspectives (Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology), 48, 231-235.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27323
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology 1993. This version is reproduced with permission from Karger. http://content.karger.comen_US
dc.description.abstractThe 22-electroce cochlear prosthesis developed by the University of Melbourne and Cochlear Pty. Ltd. has been shown to provide significant speech perception benefits to profoundly deafened adults. More recently, use of an improved Multipeak encoding strategy has significantly improved speech perception performance both in quiet and in noise. Benefits to speech perception in children have not as yet been fully documented, in part due to the shorter history of implant use in children and the smaller overall number of children implanted as compared with adults. The first implantation of the 22-electrode cochlear prosthesis in a child was carried out in Melbourne in January of 1985. In Melbourne, a 5-year-old child was operated on in April 1986, and a first congenitally deaf child in April 1987. The age of implantation has been progressively reduced, with the first 2-year-old child implanted in Melbourne in 1990. As at January 1992, approximately 1,200 children (under 18 years of age inclusive) have been implanted worldwide with the 22-electrode cochlear prosthesis. Of this number, approximately 50% are under the age of 6 years. The age of the child, aetiology of the hearing loss, age at onset and duration of the hearing loss, education program attended both prior to and subsequent to implantation, and parental motivation to assist in habilitation are all factors which may affect an individual child's development and progress with the device. Evaluation of performance in children is complicated by a number of issues, including the effects of delayed speech and language development, and the ability of individual children to perform auditory tests. The measure of performance chosen for any evaluation will also reflect the interests of the particular clinician. For example, effects of device use on speech production may be of interest to the speech therapist, whereas educational progress will be of primary importance to the teacher of an implanted child. However, in choosing an appropriate evaluation test to measure progress woth the cochlear prosthesis, it is vital to realize that all measures such as effects of device use on speech production, educational progress, development of language, and effects on social and communication skills depend on the child being able to accurately perceive speech information through her/his device.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol. 7, 1992-1993 no.444en_US
dc.subjectcochlear implanten_US
dc.subjectotolaryngologyen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.titlePreliminary speech perception results for children with the 22-electrode Melbourne/ cochlear hearing prosthesisen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
melbourne.source.titleCochlear implants: new perspectives (Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology)en_US
melbourne.source.volume48en_US
melbourne.source.pages231-235en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorCowan, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.contributor.authorDettman, Shani
melbourne.contributor.authorRance, Gary
melbourne.contributor.authorPYMAN, BRIAN
melbourne.contributor.authorSarant, Julia
melbourne.contributor.authorBARKER, ELIZABETH
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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