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dc.contributor.authorDooley, Gary J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSeligman, Peter M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:18:47Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:18:47Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationDooley, G. J., Blamey, P. J., Seligman, P. M., & Clark, G. M. (1993). A "Combionic Aid": Combined speech processing for a cochlear implant in one ear and speech processing hearing aid in the other ear [Abstract]. In Annual General and Scientific Meeting of the Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Adelaide.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27328
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an abstract from the Annual General and Scientific Meeting of the Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, March 1993. This version is reproduced with permission from Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.en_US
dc.description.abstractIndependent use of a cochlear implant in one ear and a hearing aid in the other is not acceptable for many implant users with some residual hearing. Psychophysical evidence suggests that there are substantial interactions between acoustic and electrical signals including masking and loudness summation. These effects may contribute to the difficulty in using two independent devices and it is desirable to control the parameters of the electrical and acoustical signals far more accurately than is possible with two independent devices with separate microphones. In order to achieve this control we have developed a Combionic aid incorporating an implant and an 'in1planlcompatible' hearing aid controlled from the same speech processor. The new processor is particularly flexible and can implement a wide variety of speech processing strategies for combined acoustic and electrical stimulation. A benchtop prototype has been tested with five patients using a range of different speech tests. In general, patients do better when they use acoustic and electrical information simultaneously than they do with either alone. Some patients on some tests perform significantly better with the bimodal aid than they do with independent hearing aids and implant processors worn together. Wearable devices have now been built and evaluations of these devices are continuing.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol. 7, 1992-1993 no. 513en_US
dc.subjectotolaryngologyen_US
dc.subjectcochlear implanten_US
dc.subjectcombionic aiden_US
dc.titleA "Combionic Aid": Combined speech processing for a cochlear implant in one ear and speech processing hearing aid in the other ear [Abstract]en_US
dc.typeConference Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleAnnual General and Scientific Meeting of the Australian Society of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgeryen_US
melbourne.source.monthMarchen_US
melbourne.source.pages58en_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceAdelaideen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter
melbourne.contributor.authorSeligman, Peter
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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