Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDowell, Richard C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDettman, Shani J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDawson, Pamela W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:20:55Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:20:55Z
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationDowell, R. C., Clark, G. M., Dettman, S. J., & Dawson, P. W. (1992). Results for children and adolescents using the multichannel cochlear prosthesis [Abstract]. Australian Journal of Audiology, Suppl. 5, 13.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27363
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in Australian Journal of Audiology 1992. This version is reproduced with permission from the publisher, Australian Academic Press. http://www.australianacademicpress.com.au/en_US
dc.description.abstractThe first adolescent to use the 22-electrode cochlear prosthesis was Implanted In Melbourne in 1985 and the first child (less than 10 years), the following year. Since then, over 100 children have received the cochlear prosthesis in Australia and over 1200 worldwide. Detailed assessment of 200 children in the U.S.A., Australia and Germany lead to the market approval of the prosthesis by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in July 1990. The analysis of results for these children has proven to be difficult due to the use of different tests in different places, the lack of appropriate assessment tools for young children, the wide range of performance, and the problems of cooperation for young children. Despite these problems, some trends are beginning to emerge in the speech perception results for implanted children. Children with a greater amount of auditory experience before becoming profoundly deaf tend to perform better, as do children with more experience with the cochlear prosthesis. Those with a greater number of electrodes in use also perform better, a result supported by adult studies. Although older prelinguistically deafened children do not perform as well as postlinguistically deafened adults, there appears to be little difference between results for pre-and post-linguistically deafened young children. These trends In speech perception results will be discussed in more detail.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol. 6, 1991-1992 no. 549en_US
dc.subjectotologyen_US
dc.subjectpaediatric otologyen_US
dc.subjectcochlear implanten_US
dc.subjectsafety studiesen_US
dc.titleResults for children and adolescents using the multichannel cochlear prosthesis [Abstract]en_US
dc.typeJournal Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleAustralian Journal of Audiologyen_US
melbourne.source.volumeSuppl. 5en_US
melbourne.source.pages13en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.contributor.authorDettman, Shani
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record