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dc.contributor.authorDahm, Markus C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFranz, Burkhard K-H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShepherd, Robert K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBurton, Martin J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorROBINS-BROWNE, ROYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:21:29Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:21:29Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationDahm, M. C., Clark, G. M., Franz, B. K., Shepherd, R. K., Burton, M. J., & Robins-Browne, R. (1994). Cochlear implantation in children: labyrinthitis following pneumococcal otitis media in unimplanted and implanted cat cochleas. Acta Otolaryngologica, 114, 620-625.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27373
dc.descriptionPublisher’s permission requested and denied.en_US
dc.description.abstractPneumococcal otitis media is frequent in young children and could lead to labyrinthitis post-implantation. To assess the risk and methods of minimizing it by a graft to the round window around the electrode entry point, we have used a cat animal model of pneumococcal otitis media. Twenty-one kittens were used in the study. Thirty-two cochleas were implanted when the kittens were 2 months of age. Fourteen cochleas were implanted without using a graft (12 were available for study); 9 had a fascial graft, and 9 a Gelfoam® graft (7 were available for study). The implanted kittens had their bullae inoculated with Streptococcus pneumoniae 2 months after implantation and were sacrificed 1 week later. There were also 9 unimplanted control ears which were inoculated when the animals were 4 months of age. Labyrinthitis occurred in 44% of unimplanted control, 50% of implanted ungrafted, and 6% of implanted grafted (fascia and Gelfoam®) cochleas. There was no statistically significant difference between the unimplanted control and the implanted cochleas (p < 0.05). There was, however, a difference between the implanted-ungrafted and implanted grafted cochleas, but not between the use of fascia and Gelfoam® to graft the round window entry point. As a result, the data indicates that cochlear implantation does not increase the risk of labyrinthitis following pneumococcal otitis media, but it is desirable to use fascia as a graft to the round window around the electrode entry point.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.8, 1994-1995, no.348en_US
dc.subjectdeafnessen_US
dc.subjecthearing prosthesisen_US
dc.subjectStreptococcus pneumoniaeen_US
dc.subjectanimal modelen_US
dc.subjectround window membraneen_US
dc.titleCochlear implantation in children: labyrinthitis following pneumococcal otitis media in unimplanted and implanted cat cochleasen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
melbourne.source.titleActa Otolaryngologicaen_US
melbourne.source.volume114en_US
melbourne.source.pages620-625en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorShepherd, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorFranz, Burkhard
melbourne.contributor.authorRobins-Browne, Roy
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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