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dc.contributor.authorDOWELL, RICHARDen_US
dc.contributor.authorSELIGMAN, PETERen_US
dc.contributor.authorMCDERMOTT, HUGHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitford, Lesleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBLAMEY, PETERen_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:23:49Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:23:49Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationDowell, R., Seligman, P., McDermott, H., Whitford, L., Blamey, P., & Clark, G. M. (1994). Signal processing for multichannel cochlear implants: past, present and future [Abstract]. Australian Journal of Audiology, 15(suppl.2), 41-42.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27412
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in Australian Journal of Audiology 1994. This version is reproduced with permission from the publisher, Australian Academic Press. http://www.australianacademicpress.com.au/en_US
dc.description.abstractSince the late 1970's, many groups have worked on developing effective signal processing for multichannel cochlear implants. The main aim of such schemes has been to provide the best possible speech perception for those using the device. Secondary aims of providing awareness and discrimination of environmental sounds and appreciation of music have also been considered. Early designs included some that attempted to simulate the normal cochlea. The application of such complex processing schemes was limited by the technology of the times. In some cases, researchers reverted to the use of single channel systems which could be controlled reliably with the existing technology. In other cases, as with the Australian implant, a simple multichannel processing scheme was devised that allowed a reliable implementation with available electronics. Over the next 15 years, largely due to the improvements in integrated circuit technology, the signal processors have slowly become more complex. Further psychophysical research has shown how additional information can be transferred effectively to implant users via electrical stimulation of the cochlea. This has lead to rapid improvement in the speech perception abilities of adults using cochlear implants. Some of the main developments in signal processing over the last 15 years will be discussed along with the latest speech perception results obtained with the new SPEAK processing scheme for the Australian 22-channel cochlear implant. Initial results for SPEAK show mean scores of 70% (equivalent to 85-90% phoneme scores) for open set monosyllabic word testing for experienced adult users. Although there remains a large range of performance for all users of cochlear implants, average speech perception scores for all implanted adults have also improved significantly with the developments in signal processing. It appears likely that multichannel cochlear implants will be a viable alternative for the treatment of severe hearing loss in the future.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.8, 1994-1995, no.700en_US
dc.subjectcochlear implantsen_US
dc.subjectsignal processingen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.subjectelectrical stimulationen_US
dc.subjectSPEAKen_US
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.subjectdeafnessen_US
dc.titleSignal processing for multichannel cochlear implants: past, present and future [Abstract]en_US
dc.typeJournal Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleAustralian Journal of Audiologyen_US
melbourne.source.volume15en_US
melbourne.source.issuesuppl.2en_US
melbourne.source.pages41-42en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorSeligman, Peter
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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