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dc.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlcantara, Joseph I.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:23:56Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:23:56Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationBlamey, P. J., & Alcantara, J. I. (1994). Research in auditory training. In J. Gagne & N. Tye-Murray (Ed.), Research in audiological rehabilitation: current trends and future directions (pp. 161-191). Cedar Falls, Iowa: Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27414
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of Chapter 8 in Research in Audiological Rehabilitation: Current Trends and Future Directions published by the Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology. This version is reproduced with the permission of Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology.en_US
dc.description.abstractSpeech perception and communication can improve as a result of experience, and auditory training is one way of providing experiences that may be beneficial. One of the most important factors influencing the effectiveness of auditory training is the amount of experience the client already has. Other factors include the severity of the hearing loss, the sensory device used, the environment, personal qualities of the client and clinician, the type of training, and the type of evaluation used. Despite a long history of clinical practice, the effects of these factors have been investigated in few controlled studies. Even in special cases where training has an obvious role, such as adults using cochlear implants, there has been little objective comparison of alternative training methods. One reason for this is the difficulty of carrying out definitive experiments that measure changes in performance over time in the presence of many confounding variables. These variables may also help to explain the apparently contradictory results that can be found in the literature on auditory training and in the diverse points of view expressed by practicing clinicians. Issues and methods appropriate for research in auditory training among adult clients are discussed with reference to the needs of modem clinical practice.en_US
dc.publisherAcademy of Rehabilitative Audiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.8, 1994-1995, no.707en_US
dc.subjectotolaryngologyen_US
dc.subjectauditory trainingen_US
dc.subjectaudiological rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectaudiologyen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.subjecthearing lossen_US
dc.subjectsensory deviceen_US
dc.subjectcochlear implantsen_US
dc.titleResearch in auditory trainingen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
melbourne.source.titleResearch in audiological rehabilitation: current trends and future directionsen_US
melbourne.source.pages161-191en_US
melbourne.source.editorGagne, J-P.en_US
melbourne.source.editorTye-Murray, N.en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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