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dc.contributor.authorCowan, R. S. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitford, L. A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGalvin, K. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSarant, J. Z.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarker, E. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShaw, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSkok, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSeligman, P. M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDowell, R. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEveringham, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGibson, W. P. R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:24:31Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:24:31Z
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationCowan, R. S. C., Brown, C., Whitford, L. A., Galvin, K. L., Sarant, J. Z., Barker, E. J., et al. (1995). Speech perception in children using the advanced Speak speech-processing strategy. Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology, 104(suppl.166), 318-321.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27424
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology published by Annals Publishing Company. This version is reproduced with permission from Annals Publishing Company. http://www.annals.com/en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Speak speech-processing strategy, developed by the University of Melbourne and commercialized by Cochlear Pty Limited for use in the new Spectra 22 speech processor, has been shown to provide improved speech perception for adults in both quiet and noisy situations. The present study evaluated the ability of children experienced in the use of the Multipeak (Mpeak) speech-processing strategy (implemented in the Nucleus Minisystem-22 cochlear implant) to adapt to and benefit from the advanced Speak speech-processing strategy (implemented in the Nucleus Spectra 22 speech processor). Twelve children were assessed using Mpeak and Speak over a period of 8 months. All of the children had over 1 year's previous experience with Mpeak, and all were able to score significantly on open-set word and sentence tests using the cochlear implant alone. Children were assessed with both live-voice and recorded speech materials, including Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant monosyllabic words and Speech Intelligibility Test sentences. Assessments were made in both quiet and in noise. Assessments were made at 3-week intervals to investigate the ability of the children to adapt to the new speech-processing strategy. For most of the children, a significant advantage was evident when using the Speak strategy as compared with Mpeak. For 4 of the children, there was no decrement in speech perception scores immediately following fitting with Speak. Eight of the children showed a small (10% to 20%) decrement in speech perception scores for between 3 and 6 weeks following the changeover to Speak. After 24 weeks' experience with Speak, 11 of the children had shown a steady increase in speech perception scores, with final Speak scores higher than for Mpeak. Only 1 child showed a significant decrement in speech perception with Speak, which did not recover to original Mpeak levels.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.8, 1994-1995, no.725en_US
dc.subjectotologyen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectspeech processingen_US
dc.subjectUniversity of Melbourneen_US
dc.subjectCochlear Pty Limiteden_US
dc.subjectSpeaken_US
dc.subjectMpeaken_US
dc.subjectcochlear implanten_US
dc.titleSpeech perception in children using the advanced Speak speech-processing strategyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
melbourne.source.titleAnnals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngologyen_US
melbourne.source.volume104en_US
melbourne.source.issuesuppl.166en_US
melbourne.source.pages318-321en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorCowan, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.contributor.authorGalvin, Karyn
melbourne.contributor.authorSarant, Julia
melbourne.contributor.authorBARKER, ELIZABETH
melbourne.contributor.authorSeligman, Peter
melbourne.contributor.authorKing, Alison
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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