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dc.contributor.authorDowell, R. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlamey, P. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:25:00Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:25:00Z
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationDowell, R. C., Blamey, P. J., & Clark, G. M. (1995). Potential and limitations of cochlear implants in children. Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology, 104(suppl.166), 324-327.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27432
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology published by Annals Publishing Company. This version is reproduced with permission from Annals Publishing Company. http://www.annals.com/en_US
dc.description.abstractMultiple-channel cochlear implants have been in use with children and adolescents for 8 years. The speech perception, speech production, and language of many of these children has been investigated in some detail.l-4 There have been many predictions about factors that may affect the performance of children with implants. For instance, it has been suggested that children with a congenital loss of hearing would not have the same potential to benefit from a cochlear implant as those with an acquired loss. Similarly, it has been suggested that younger children are likely to gain more benefit from a cochlear implant because of the effect of various critical ages for language learning.5 As more results have become available, it has been our observation that the performance of any particular child with a cochlear implant does not appear to follow well-defined rules, and that generalizations about the potential of certain groups of children are likely to encounter many exceptions. We now have a large quantity of results for children using cochlear implants, and it may be possible to determine some of the factors that have a significant effect on performance. This paper will attempt to identify some of these factors by reviewing speech perception results for 100 children implanted with the Nucleus 22-channel cochlear prosthesis in Australia and speech perception results for adult patients. This analysis will use an "information processing" model of a child using a cochlear implant. That is, we will assume that a child will benefit from a cochlear implant in terms of speech perception, production, and language development, if he or she receives a maximal amount of auditory information from the environment, and is able to process this information successfully. This model divides potential limiting or predictive factors into those that affect the information presented to the auditory system (eg, implant technology, surviving auditory neurons) and those that affect the processing of this information (eg, development of central auditory pathways, amount and consistency of auditory input).en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.8, 1994-1995, no.738en_US
dc.subjectotologyen_US
dc.subjectcochlear implantsen_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.subjectspeech productionen_US
dc.subjectdeafnessen_US
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.subjectauditory systemen_US
dc.titlePotential and limitations of cochlear implants in childrenen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
melbourne.source.titleAnnals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngologyen_US
melbourne.source.volume104en_US
melbourne.source.issuesuppl.166en_US
melbourne.source.pages324-327en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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