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dc.contributor.authorGrogan, M. L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarker, E. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDettman, S. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlamey, P. J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:25:04Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:25:04Z
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationGrogan, M. L., Barker, E. J., Dettman, S. J., & Blamey, P. J. (1995). Phonetic and phonological changes in the connected speech of children using a cochlear implant. Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology, 104(suppl.166), 390-393.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27433
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology published by Annals Publishing Company. This version is reproduced with permission from Annals Publishing Company. http://www.annals.com/en_US
dc.description.abstractIn excess of 5,000 children, with profound hearing impairment, have received a cochlear implant hearing device. Researchers have recently begun to study the speech production skills of these children.1-6 This topic is of interest because the speech of young prelingually or postlingually deaf children is in a constant state of development. The effectiveness of the implant, therefore, must be measured in its ability to provide enough auditory information for the child to develop intelligible speech. This is in addition to the maintenance of intelligible speech in the case of older postlingually deaf children or adults. The aim of the present study was to investigate some characteristics of the connected speech of a selected group of children from the University of Melbourne Cochlear Implant Programme. More specifically, the study aimed to determine how these characteristics changed over time. Studies of conversational speech samples are useful in that they do not depend on imitation yet they do reflect the child's everyday communication skills and are sensitive to co-articulatory effects. Analyses performed on the preoperative and postoperative data aimed to detect both the phonetic and phonologic changes in the segmental features of speech. The following questions were addressed: 1) What was the pattern of change in the phonetic inventories from before to after implantation? 2) Was there a difference in the correct production of consonants depending on their position in the word? 3) Did the group performance for correct production of phonemes change significantly from before to after implantation? 4) Did performance change over time for individuals? 5) What were the most common phonologic processes and was there a significant reduction in any of these processes from before to after implantation?en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.8, 1994-1995, no.740en_US
dc.subjectcochlear implanten_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectdeafnessen_US
dc.subjectspeech productionen_US
dc.subjectUniversity of Melbourneen_US
dc.titlePhonetic and phonological changes in the connected speech of children using a cochlear implanten_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
melbourne.source.titleAnnals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngologyen_US
melbourne.source.volume104en_US
melbourne.source.issuesuppl.166en_US
melbourne.source.pages390-393en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorBARKER, ELIZABETH
melbourne.contributor.authorDettman, Shani
melbourne.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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