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dc.contributor.authorGalvin, Karyn L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCowan, Robert S. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSarant, Julia Z.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTobey, Emily A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:26:20Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:26:20Z
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationGalvin, K. L., Cowan, R. S. C., Sarant, J. Z., Tobey, E. A., Blamey, P. J., & Clark, G. M. (1995). Articulation accuracy of children using an electrotactile speech processor. Ear and Hearing, 16, 209-219.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27454
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in Ear and Hearing 1995. This version is reproduced with permission of Lippincott Wilkins & Williams.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: Use of wearable tactile speech perception devices is suggested to help overcome the difficulties in speech production resulting from severe and profound hearing impairment in children. This suggestion is based on the assumption that subjects can use tactile input in isolation, or in combination with information from residual aided hearing, to monitor and modify their speech. The present study evaluated the benefits to articulation provided through use of a multichannel electrotactile device (“Tickle Talker™”). Design: Six profoundly hearing-impaired children were videotaped speaking with the Tickle Talker on and with the Tickle Talker off during conversations with their audiologist. Five of the subjects also wore their binaural hearing aids during all recorded conversations. The number of vowels, consonants, and overall phonemes correctly articulated by each child in the two conditions were compared. Results: One subject improved articulation of initial consonants and initial phonemes; one subject improved articulation of total vowels, total consonants, initial consonants, total phonemes, and initial phonemes; and a third subject improved articulation of total vowels and medial phonemes. Conclusions: Use of on-line tactile feedback from the Tickle Talker may benefit the articulation accuracy of some children, and the device may therefore be suitable to use with children who have not responded to more traditional speech training techniques.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.8, 1994-1995, no.790en_US
dc.subjectelectrotactile speech processoren_US
dc.subjectchildrenen_US
dc.subjectarticulationen_US
dc.subjectspeech perception deviceen_US
dc.subjectdeafnessen_US
dc.subjectTickle Talkeren_US
dc.titleArticulation accuracy of children using an electrotactile speech processoren_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
melbourne.source.titleEar and Hearingen_US
melbourne.source.volume16en_US
melbourne.source.pages209-219en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorSarant, Julia
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorBlamey, Peter
melbourne.contributor.authorCowan, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorGalvin, Karyn
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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