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dc.contributor.authorVelez-Mora, D
dc.contributor.authorRamon, P
dc.contributor.authorVallejo, C
dc.contributor.authorRomero, A
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, D
dc.contributor.authorQuintana-Ascencio, PF
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-21T01:03:17Z
dc.date.available2021-05-21T01:03:17Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-01
dc.identifier.citationVelez-Mora, D., Ramon, P., Vallejo, C., Romero, A., Duncan, D. & Quintana-Ascencio, P. F. (2021). Environmental drivers of femaleness of an inter-Andean monoecious shrub. BIOTROPICA, 53 (1), pp.17-27. https://doi.org/10.1111/btp.12839.
dc.identifier.issn0006-3606
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/274720
dc.description.abstractHetero‐and conspecific interactions, nutrient availability, climate, habitat heterogeneity, and disturbances can generate variation and spatial patterns of femaleness in plants. We assessed whether year, site, plant size, plant density, and canopy area of conspecific neighbors influenced the expression and spatial aggregation of femaleness in Croton aff. wagneri, a monoecious shrub from dry shrublands of the inter‐Andean valleys in Ecuador. We georeferenced in two sites (1,700 and 1,400 m.a.s.l) in five 10 × 10 m plots, within each site, the position of each Croton reproductive plant during first part of flowering season in two years, and measured their height, length, and width. The femaleness index of each plant was determined by the number of female and male buds and flowers. Plant density was determined for each plot, along with the number of neighbors and the summed canopy area of conspecific neighbors (at 1.0, 2.0, and 2.5 m radius, and the five closest plants) from each focal plant. Croton´s femaleness at the lower elevation site was greater than at the higher elevation site and increased with plant size and with canopy of the closest five neighbors. Soil at the lower elevation site had higher temperatures and lower water content. Aggregate patterns of femaleness were found in more plots at the lower elevation site. Our results indicate that location, plant size, and canopies of conspecific neighbors of Croton can affect femaleness and its aggregation and support the hypothesis that femaleness can be influenced by facilitative interactions.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.titleEnvironmental drivers of femaleness of an inter-Andean monoecious shrub
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/btp.12839
melbourne.affiliation.departmentSchool of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences
melbourne.affiliation.facultyScience
melbourne.source.titleBiotropica
melbourne.source.volume53
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages17-27
melbourne.elementsid1461262
melbourne.openaccess.urlhttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/btp.12839
melbourne.openaccess.statusPublished version
melbourne.contributor.authorDuncan, David
dc.identifier.eissn1744-7429
melbourne.accessrightsAccess this item via the Open Access location


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