Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCowan, R. S. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarker, E. J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPegg, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDettman, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRennie, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGalvin, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMeskin, T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRance, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCody, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSarant, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLarratt, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLatus, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHOLLOW, RODNEYen_US
dc.contributor.authorRehn, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDowell, R. C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPyman, B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGibson, W. P. R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:30:46Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:30:46Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationCowan, R. S. C., Barker, E. J., Pegg, P., Dettman, S. J., Rennie, M., Galvin, K., et al. (1998). Speech perception in implanted children: influence of preoperative residual hearing on outcomes [Abstract]. Australian Journal of Audiology, 20(suppl.), 79.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27526
dc.descriptionAbstract of a poster presentation given at the 13th National Scientific Conference and Workshops Audiological Society of Australia. Brighton Beach, Sydney, 28 April -1 May 1998en_US
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an abstract published in Australian Journal of Audiology 1998. This version is reproduced with permission from the publisher, Australian Academic Press. http://www.australianacademicpress.com.au/en_US
dc.description.abstractSince the first child was implanted with the Nucleus 22-channel prosthesis in Melbourne in 1985, several thousand children world-wide have now benefitted from this technology. More effective paediatric assessment and management procedures have now been developed, allowing cochlear implants to be offered to children under the age of 2 years. Improvements in speech processing strategy have also been implemented in the Nucleus implant system, resulting in increased mean speech perception benefits for implanted adults. Although a range of performance on formal measures of hearing, speech or language has been reported for children using implants, results from the first decade of implant experience consistently show that significant benefits are available to children receiving their implant at an early age. Reported speech perception results for implanted children show that a considerable proportion (60%) of paediatric patients in the Melbourne and Sydney clinics are able to understand some open-set speech using electrical stimulation alone. These results, and the upward trend of mean speech perception benefits shown for postlinguistically deafened adults have raised questions as to whether severely, or severely-to-profoundly deaf children currently using hearing aids would in fact benefit more from a cochlear implant. To investigate the potential influence of the degree of preoperative residual hearing on postoperative speech perception, results for all implanted children in the Melbourne and Sydney cochlear implant programs were analysed. Results showed that as a group, children with higher levels of preoperative residual hearing were consistently more likely to achieve open-set speech perception benefits. Potential factors in this finding could be higher levels of ganglion cell survival or greater patterning of the auditory pathways using conventional hearing aids prior to implantation. Conversely, children with the least preoperative residual hearing were less predictable, with some children achieving open-set perception, and others showing more limited closed-set benefits to perception. For these children, it is likely that preoperative residual hearing is of less significance than other factors in outcomes.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.11, 1998-1999, no.1172en_US
dc.subjectotolaryngologyen_US
dc.subjectcochlear implanten_US
dc.subjectspeech processingen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.titleSpeech perception in implanted children: influence of preoperative residual hearing on outcomes [Abstract]en_US
dc.typeJournal Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleAustralian Journal of Audiologyen_US
melbourne.source.volume20en_US
melbourne.source.issuesuppl.en_US
melbourne.source.pages79en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorCowan, Robert
melbourne.contributor.authorBARKER, ELIZABETH
melbourne.contributor.authorHOLLOW, RODNEY
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.contributor.authorDettman, Shani
melbourne.contributor.authorGalvin, Karyn
melbourne.contributor.authorSarant, Julia
melbourne.contributor.authorRance, Gary
melbourne.contributor.authorPYMAN, BRIAN
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record