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dc.contributor.authorDawson, P. W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:32:29Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:32:29Z
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationDawson, P. W., & Clark, G. M. (1997). Changes in synthetic and natural vowel perception after specific training for congenitally deafened patients using a multichannel cochlear implant. Ear and Hearing, 18, 488-501.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27554
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in Ear and Hearing 1997. This version is reproduced with permission of Lippincott Wilkins & Williams.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: The aim was to determine whether the ability to use place-coded vowel formant information could be improved after training in a group of congenitally deafened patients, who showed limited speech perception ability after cochlear implant use ranging from 1 yr 8 mo to 6 yr 11 mo. A further aim was to investigate the relationship between electrode position difference limens and vowel recognition. Design: Three children, one adolescent, and one young adult were assessed with synthesized versions of the words /hid, head, had, hud, hod, hood/ containing three formants and with a natural version of these words as well as with a 12-alternative, closed-set task containing monosyllabic words. The change in performance during a nontraining period was compared to the change in performance after 10 training sessions. Results: After training, two children showed significant gains on a number of tests and improvements were consistent with their electrode discrimination ability. Difference limens ranged from one to three electrodes for these patients as well as for two other patients who showed minimal to no improvements. The minimal gains shown by the final patient could be partly explained by poorer apical electrode position difference limen. Conclusions: Significant gains in vowel perception occurred post-training on several assessments for two of the children. This suggests the need for children to continue to have aural rehabilitation for a substantial period after implantation. Minimal improvements, however, occurred for the remaining patients. With the exception of one patient, their poorer performance was not associated with poorer electrode discrimination.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.10, 1997, no. 931en_US
dc.subjectcochlear implantsen_US
dc.subjectplace-codingen_US
dc.subjectspeech perceptionen_US
dc.titleChanges in synthetic and natural vowel perception after specific training for congenitally deafened patients using a multichannel cochlear implanten_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
melbourne.source.titleEar and Hearingen_US
melbourne.source.volume18en_US
melbourne.source.pages488-501en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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