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dc.contributor.authorDowell, RC
dc.contributor.authorDettman, SJ
dc.contributor.authorHill, K
dc.contributor.authorWinton, E
dc.contributor.authorBarker, EJ
dc.contributor.authorClark, GM
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:35:22Z
dc.date.issued2002-05-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000175585600020&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1c
dc.identifier.citationDowell, R. C., Dettman, S. J., Hill, K., Winton, E., Barker, E. J. & Clark, G. M. (2002). Speech perception outcomes in older children who use multichannel cochlear implants: Older is not always poorer. ANNALS OF OTOLOGY RHINOLOGY AND LARYNGOLOGY, 111 (5), pp.97-101. https://doi.org/10.1177/00034894021110S520.
dc.identifier.issn0003-4894
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27600
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology published by Annals Publishing Company. This version is reproduced with permission from Annals Publishing Company. http://www.annals.com/
dc.description.abstractSpeech perception outcomes for early-deafened children who undergo implantation as teenagers or young adults are generally reported to be poorer than results for young children. It is important to provide appropriate expectations when counseling adolescents and their families to help them make an informed choice regarding cochlear implant surgery. The considerable variation of results in this group makes this process more difficult. This study considered a number of factors in a group of 25 children who underwent implantation in Melbourne between the ages of 8 and 18 years. Each subject completed open-set speech perception testing with Bamford-Kowal-Bench sentences before and after implantation and preoperative language testing with the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test. Data were collected regarding the type of hearing loss, age at implantation, age at hearing aid fitting, audiometric details, and preoperative and postoperative communication mode. Results were submitted to a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis with postoperative open-set sentence scores as the dependent variables. The analysis suggested that 3 factors have a significant predictive value for speech perception after implantation: preoperative open-set sentence score, duration of profound hearing loss, and equivalent language age. These 3 factors accounted for 66% of the variance in this group. The results of this study suggest that children who have useful speech perception before implantation, and higher age-equivalent scores on language measures, would be expected to do well with a cochlear implant. Consistent with other studies, a shorter duration of profound hearing loss is also advantageous. The mean sentence score for this group, 47%, was not significantly different from the mean result across all children in the Melbourne program.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherANNALS PUBL CO
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.13, 2002-2004, no.1498
dc.subjectchild
dc.subjectcochlear implant
dc.subjectpredictive factor
dc.subjectspeech perception
dc.titleSpeech perception outcomes in older children who use multichannel cochlear implants: Older is not always poorer
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/00034894021110S520
melbourne.source.titleANNALS OF OTOLOGY RHINOLOGY AND LARYNGOLOGY
melbourne.source.volume111
melbourne.source.issue5
melbourne.source.pages97-101
melbourne.publicationid10806
melbourne.elementsid253204
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.contributor.authorDettman, Shani
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorBARKER, ELIZABETH
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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