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dc.contributor.authorDowell, Richard C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDettman, Shani J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWILLIAMS, SARAHen_US
dc.contributor.authorTOMOV, ALEXANDRAen_US
dc.contributor.authorHollow, Roden_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T20:35:30Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:35:30Z
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationDowell, R. C., Dettman, S. J., Williams, S., Tomov, A., Hollow, R., & Clark, G. M. (2002). The effects of post-implant habilitation on long-term outcomes for children using multichannel cochlear implants [Abstract]. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Audiology, 23(2), 90-91.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27602
dc.descriptionAbstract of paper presented at XXVI International Congress of Audiology, Melbourne, 17-21 March 2002.en_US
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an abstract published in Australian and New Zealand Journal of Audiology 2002. This version is reproduced with permission from the publisher, Australian Academic Press. http://www.australianacademicpress.com.au/en_US
dc.description.abstractThose working in the cochlear implant field advocate a regular habilitation program for young children receiving implants. Developing auditory skills and the incorporating these into general language development are considered to be key areas for such programs. Investigations of speech perception and language outcomes have demonstrated that the emphasis of spoken language development appears to enhance the results for implanted children. It remains difficult, however, to demonstrate the effect of habilitation as a separate factor and to determine how much individual attention is desirable for each child. This preliminary study considered the long term speech perception and language outcomes for two groups of children who received Nucleus cochlear implants in Melbourne. The first group (n = 17) was identified as receiving regular habilitation from the Melbourne Cochlear Implant Clinic over a four year post-operative period. A second group (n = 11) was identified as receiving very little regular habilitation over the post-operative period. Language and speech perception results for these two groups showed significant differences in performance on a wide range of measures. The group who received regular, formal habilitation demonstrated better performance on all measures. These groups included only congenitally, profoundly hearing- impaired children and did not differ significantly on mean age at implant or experience at the time of assessment. A more comprehensive study is needed to clarify these results on a larger group of children, and to control for additional confounding variables. Nonetheless, these results provide support for the incorporation of regular long-term habilitation into cochlear implant programs for children.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol. 13 2002-2004, no.1539en_US
dc.subjecttympanic membraneen_US
dc.subjecttransplantationen_US
dc.subjectdeafnessen_US
dc.subjectrehabilitationen_US
dc.subjecthearing aidsen_US
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.subjectaudiologyen_US
dc.subjectresearch - Australia.en_US
dc.titleThe effects of post-implant habilitation on long-term outcomes for children using multichannel cochlear implants [Abstract]en_US
dc.typeJournal Itemen_US
melbourne.source.titleAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Audiologyen_US
melbourne.source.volume23en_US
melbourne.source.issue2en_US
melbourne.source.pages90-91en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorTOMOV, ALEXANDRA
melbourne.contributor.authorDowell, Richard
melbourne.contributor.authorDettman, Shani
melbourne.contributor.authorWILLIAMS, SARAH SUE
melbourne.contributor.authorHOLLOW, RODNEY
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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