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dc.contributor.authorBryant, RA
dc.contributor.authorCreamer, M
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, M
dc.contributor.authorSilove, D
dc.contributor.authorClark, CR
dc.contributor.authorMcFarlane, AC
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:38:31Z
dc.date.issued2009-11-01
dc.identifierpii: S1355617709990671
dc.identifier.citationBryant, R. A., Creamer, M., O'Donnell, M., Silove, D., Clark, C. R. & McFarlane, A. C. (2009). Post-traumatic amnesia and the nature of post-traumatic stress disorder after mild traumatic brain injury. JOURNAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY, 15 (6), pp.862-867. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1355617709990671.
dc.identifier.issn1355-6177
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27649
dc.descriptionC1 - Journal Articles Refereed
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence and nature of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is controversial because of the apparent paradox of suffering PTSD with impaired memory for the traumatic event. In this study, 1167 survivors of traumatic injury (MTBI: 459, No TBI: 708) were assessed for PTSD symptoms and post-traumatic amnesia during hospitalization, and were subsequently assessed for PTSD 3 months later (N = 920). At the follow-up assessment, 90 (9.4%) patients met criteria for PTSD (MTBI: 50, 11.8%; No-TBI: 40, 7.5%); MTBI patients were more likely to develop PTSD than no-TBI patients, after controlling for injury severity (adjusted odds ratio: 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.78-2.94). Longer post-traumatic amnesia was associated with less severe intrusive memories at the acute assessment. These findings indicate that PTSD may be more likely following MTBI, however, longer post-traumatic amnesia appears to be protective against selected re-experiencing symptoms.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherCAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS
dc.subjectMental Health; Mental Health
dc.titlePost-traumatic amnesia and the nature of post-traumatic stress disorder after mild traumatic brain injury
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1355617709990671
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentPsychiatry
melbourne.source.titleJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
melbourne.source.volume15
melbourne.source.issue6
melbourne.source.pages862-867
melbourne.publicationid132407
melbourne.elementsid314702
melbourne.contributor.authorCreamer, Mark
melbourne.contributor.authorO'Donnell, Meaghan
dc.identifier.eissn1469-7661
melbourne.fieldofresearch420313 Mental health services
melbourne.seocode200409 Mental health
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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