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dc.contributor.authorFrijters, P
dc.contributor.authorShields, MA
dc.contributor.authorPrice, SW
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:46:48Z
dc.date.issued2007-01-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000243508900005&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1c
dc.identifier.citationFrijters, P., Shields, M. A. & Price, S. W. (2007). Investigating the quitting decision of nurses: Panel data evidence from the British National Health Service. HEALTH ECONOMICS, 16 (1), pp.57-73. https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.1144.
dc.identifier.issn1057-9230
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27776
dc.descriptionC1 - Refereed Journal Article
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we provide a detailed investigation into the quitting behaviour of nurses in the British National Health Service (NHS), using a recently constructed longitudinal survey. We fit both single and competing risks duration models that enable us to establish the characteristics of those nurses who leave the public sector, distinguish the importance of pay in this decision and document the destinations that nurses move to. Contrary to expectations, we find that the hourly wage received by nurses outside of the NHS is around 20% lower than in the NHS, and that hours of work are about the same. However, while the effect of wages is found to be statistically significant, the predicted impact of an increase in nurses' pay on retention rates is small. The current nurse retention problem in the NHS is therefore unlikely to be eliminated through substantially increased pay.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.subjectApplied Economics
dc.titleInvestigating the quitting decision of nurses: Panel data evidence from the British National Health Service
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hec.1144
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentEconomics & Commerce - Economics
melbourne.source.titleHEALTH ECONOMICS
melbourne.source.volume16
melbourne.source.issue1
melbourne.source.pages57-73
dc.research.codefor1402
melbourne.publicationid74424
melbourne.elementsid261859
melbourne.contributor.authorShields, Michael
dc.identifier.eissn1099-1050
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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