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dc.contributor.authorAntonazzo, E
dc.contributor.authorScott, A
dc.contributor.authorSkatun, D
dc.contributor.authorElliott, RF
dc.date.available2014-05-21T20:46:56Z
dc.date.issued2003-06-01
dc.identifierhttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000183314300003&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=d4d813f4571fa7d6246bdc0dfeca3a1c
dc.identifier.citationAntonazzo, E., Scott, A., Skatun, D. & Elliott, R. F. (2003). The labour market for nursing: a review of the labour supply literature. HEALTH ECONOMICS, 12 (6), pp.465-478. https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.737.
dc.identifier.issn1057-9230
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/27778
dc.descriptionC1 - Refereed Journal Article
dc.description.abstractThe need to ensure adequate numbers of motivated health professionals is at the forefront of the modernisation of the UK NHS. The aim of this paper is to assess current understanding of the labour supply behaviour of nurses, and to propose an agenda for further research. In particular, the paper reviews American and British economics literature that focuses on empirical econometric studies based on the classical static labour supply model. American research could be classified into first generation, second generation and recent empirical evidence. Advances in methods mirror those in the general labour economics literature, and include the use of limited dependent variable models and the treatment of sample selection issues. However, there is considerable variation in results, which depends on the methods used, particularly on the effect of wages. Only one study was found that used UK data, although other studies examined the determinants of turnover, quit rates and job satisfaction. The agenda for further empirical research includes the analysis of discontinuities in the labour supply function, the relative importance of pecuniary and non-pecuniary job characteristics, and the application of dynamic and family labour supply models to nursing research. Such research is crucial to the development of evidence-based policies.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.subjectApplied Economics
dc.titleThe labour market for nursing: a review of the labour supply literature
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hec.737
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Institute Of Applied Economic And Social Research
melbourne.source.titleHEALTH ECONOMICS
melbourne.source.volume12
melbourne.source.issue6
melbourne.source.pages465-478
melbourne.publicationid75248
melbourne.elementsid286928
melbourne.contributor.authorScott, Anthony
dc.identifier.eissn1099-1050
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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