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dc.contributor.authorEsgin, T
dc.contributor.authorHersh, D
dc.contributor.authorRowley, K
dc.contributor.authorMacniven, R
dc.contributor.authorGlenister, K
dc.contributor.authorCrouch, A
dc.contributor.authorNewton, RU
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-18T04:45:50Z
dc.date.available2021-08-18T04:45:50Z
dc.date.issued2021-06-01
dc.identifierpii: ijerph18115969
dc.identifier.citationEsgin, T., Hersh, D., Rowley, K., Macniven, R., Glenister, K., Crouch, A. & Newton, R. U. (2021). Physical Activity and Self-Reported Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors in the Aboriginal Population in Perth, Australia, Measured Using an Adaptation of the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ). INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, 18 (11), https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18115969.
dc.identifier.issn1661-7827
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/280697
dc.description.abstractBackground: Complex, ongoing social factors have led to a context where metabolic syndrome (MetS) is disproportionately high in Aboriginal Australians. MetS is characterised by insulin resistance, abdominal obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, high blood-sugar and low HDL-C. This descriptive study aimed to document physical activity levels, including domains and intensity and sedentary behaviour, and MetS risk factors in the Perth Aboriginal (predominately Noongar) community. Methods: The Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ), together with a questionnaire on self-reported MetS risk factors, was circulated to community members for completion during 2014 (n = 129). Results: Data were analysed using chi-squared tests. The average (SD) age was 37.8 years (14) and BMI of 31.4 (8.2) kg/m2. Occupational, transport-related and leisure-time physical activity (PA) and sedentary intensities were reported across age categories. The median (interquartile range) daily sedentary time was 200 (78, 435), 240 (120, 420) and 180 (60, 300) minutes for the 18-25, 26-44 and 45+ year-olds, respectively (p = 0.973). Conclusions: An in-depth understanding of the types, frequencies and intensities of PA reported for the Perth Aboriginal community is important to implementing targeted strategies to reduce the prevalence of chronic disease in this context. Future efforts collaborating with community should aim to reduce the risk factors associated with MetS and improve quality of life.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.titlePhysical Activity and Self-Reported Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors in the Aboriginal Population in Perth, Australia, Measured Using an Adaptation of the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ)
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph18115969
melbourne.affiliation.departmentRural Clinical School
melbourne.affiliation.facultyMedicine, Dentistry & Health Sciences
melbourne.source.titleInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
melbourne.source.volume18
melbourne.source.issue11
dc.rights.licenseCC BY
melbourne.elementsid1540823
melbourne.contributor.authorGlenister, Kristen
melbourne.contributor.authorCrouch, Alan
dc.identifier.eissn1660-4601
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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