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dc.contributor.authorBriggs, R. J. S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFagan, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAtlas, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaye, A. H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSheehy, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHollow, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShaw. S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClark, Graeme M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T22:00:38Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T22:00:38Z
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationBriggs, R. J. S., Fagan, P., Atlas, M., Kaye, A. H., Sheehy, J., Hollow, R., et al. (2000). Multichannel auditory brainstem implantation: the Australian experience. The Journal of Laryngology & Otology, December, 114(Suppl. 27), 46-49.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/28752
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher’s version of an article published in The Journal of Laryngology & Otology © 2000 Cambridge University Press. www.cambridge.org/en_US
dc.description.abstractThe multichannel auditory brainstem implant (ABI) provides the potential for hearing restoration in patients with neuro bromatosis type 2 (NF2). Programmes for auditory brainstem implantation have been established in two Australian centres. Eight patients have been implanted under the protocol of an international multi-centre clinical trial. Three patients had ABI insertion at the time of first side tumour removal, four at second side tumour removal and one after previous bilateral surgery where there was some residual tumour. The translabyrinthine approach was used in all cases. Successful positioning of the electrode array was achieved in seven of eight patients, all of whom achieved auditory perception with electrical stimulation. Intra-operative electrically evoked auditory brainstem response testing was successful in four patients and was useful in confirming correct electrode position. In six cases postoperative psychophysical and auditory perception testing demonstrated that useful auditory sensations were achieved. Five of these patients regularly used the implant. In one patient electrode placement was unsuccessful and only non-auditory sensations occurred on stimulation. In the remaining patients nonauditory sensations were minimal and avoidable by selective electrode programming. Auditory brainstem implantation should be considered in patients with NF2. The greatest benefit is seen in patients without debilitating disease who have non-aidable hearing in the contralateral ear.en_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific publications, vol.12, 2000-2001, no.1350en_US
dc.subjectbrain stemen_US
dc.subjectprosthesis implantationen_US
dc.subjectneurofibromatosis 2en_US
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.titleMultichannel auditory brainstem implantation: the Australian experienceen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
melbourne.source.titleThe Journal of Laryngology & Otologyen_US
melbourne.source.monthDecemberen_US
melbourne.source.volume114en_US
melbourne.source.issueSuppl. 27en_US
melbourne.source.pages46-49en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorClark, Graeme
melbourne.contributor.authorKaye, Andrew
melbourne.contributor.authorBriggs, Robert
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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