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dc.contributor.authorWilson, SJ
dc.contributor.authorWrench, JM
dc.contributor.authorMcIntosh, AM
dc.contributor.authorBladin, PF
dc.contributor.authorBerkovic, SF
dc.date.available2014-05-21T22:03:30Z
dc.date.issued2010-07-01
dc.identifierpii: EPI2392
dc.identifier.citationWilson, S. J., Wrench, J. M., McIntosh, A. M., Bladin, P. F. & Berkovic, S. F. (2010). Profiles of psychosocial outcome after epilepsy surgery: The role of personality. EPILEPSIA, 51 (7), pp.1133-1138. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2009.02392.x.
dc.identifier.issn0013-9580
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/28785
dc.descriptionC1 - Journal Articles Refereed
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: We have previously found that the developmental time frame of epilepsy onset influences adult personality traits and subsequent adjustment to intractable seizures. In the same cohort of patients we now investigate the influence of these factors on psychosocial outcome after surgical treatment. METHODS: Fifty-seven adult patients with focal epilepsy were prospectively assessed before and after surgery. Measures of psychosocial outcome included mood, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and psychosocial adjustment, collected longitudinally at 1-, 3-, and 12-months after surgery. RESULTS: Patients with high neuroticism and low extraversion were predisposed to greater depression after surgery. More than 70% of patients with high neuroticism also reported disrupted family dynamics and difficulties adjusting to seizure freedom. The latter was associated with changes in self-identity that increased over time. Patients with epilepsy onset before or during the self-defining period of adolescence reported the greatest perceived self-change after surgery that had positive effects for HRQOL. DISCUSSION: Psychosocial outcome after epilepsy surgery appears intrinsically linked to a change in self and a transition from chronically sick to well. The development of personality traits and self-identity in the context of habitual seizures can impact psychosocial outcome and the extent of self-change reported after surgery, and paradoxically, can concur more beneficial effects.
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELL
dc.subjectBiological Psychology (Neuropsychology
dc.subjectPsychopharmacology
dc.subjectPhysiological Psychology); Surgery; Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases; Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences; Evaluation of Health Outcomes; Health Status (e.g. Indicators of Well-Being); Preventive Medicine
dc.titleProfiles of psychosocial outcome after epilepsy surgery: The role of personality
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1528-1167.2009.02392.x
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Reviewed
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourne
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne School Of Psychological Sciences
melbourne.source.titleEPILEPSIA
melbourne.source.volume51
melbourne.source.issue7
melbourne.source.pages1133-1138
melbourne.publicationid146800
melbourne.elementsid323928
melbourne.contributor.authorWilson, Sarah
melbourne.contributor.authorMcIntosh, Anne
melbourne.contributor.authorBerkovic, Samuel
melbourne.contributor.authorWrench, Joanne
melbourne.contributor.authorMullen, Saul
dc.identifier.eissn1528-1167
melbourne.fieldofresearch520202 Behavioural neuroscience
melbourne.fieldofresearch320226 Surgery
melbourne.fieldofresearch320905 Neurology and neuromuscular diseases
melbourne.seocode280103 Expanding knowledge in the biomedical and clinical science
melbourne.seocode200202 Evaluation of health outcomes
melbourne.seocode200407 Health status (incl. wellbeing)
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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