Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPiper, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.authorChambers, Iainen_US
dc.contributor.authorCiterio, Giuseppeen_US
dc.contributor.authorEnblad, Peren_US
dc.contributor.authorGregson, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorHowells, Timen_US
dc.contributor.authorKiening, Karlen_US
dc.contributor.authorMattern, Juliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNilsson, Pelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorRagauskas, Arminasen_US
dc.contributor.authorSahuquillo, Juanen_US
dc.contributor.authorDonald, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSinnott, R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStell, A.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T22:03:41Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T22:03:41Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationPiper, I., Chambers, I., Citerio, G., Enblad, P., Gregson, B., Howells, T., et al. (2009). The brain monitoring with information technology (BrainIT) collaborative network: EC feasibility study results. Acta Neurochirurgica, 102, 217-221.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/28787
dc.descriptionThis is a pre-print of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in Acta Neurochirurgica © 2009 Springer; the original publication is available at: http://www.springerlink.comen_US
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The BrainIT group works collaboratively on developing standards for collection and analyses of data from brain injured patients towards providing a more efficient infrastructure for assessing new health care technology. EC funding supported meetings over a year to discuss and define a core dataset to be collected with IT based methods from patients with traumatic brain injury. We now report on the results of a follow-up period of funding to test the feasibility for collection of the core dataset with IT based methods. METHODS: Over a three year period, data collection client and web-server based tools were developed and core data (grouped into 9 categories) were collected from 200 head-injured patients by local nursing staff. Data were uploaded by the BrainIT web and random samples of received data were selected automatically by computer for validation by data validation (DV) research nurse staff against gold standard sources held in the local centre. Validated data were compared with original data sent and percentage error rates calculated by data category. Feasibility was assessed in terms of the amount of missing data, accuracy of data collected and limitations reported by users of the IT methods. FINDINGS: Thirteen percent of data files required cleaning. Thirty “one-off” demographic and clinical data elements had significant amounts of missing data (> 15%). Validation nurses conducted 19,461 comparisons between uploaded database data with local data sources and error rates were generally less than or equal to 6%, the exception being the surgery data class where an unacceptably high error rate was found. Nearly 10,000 therapies were successfully recorded with start-times but approximately a third had inaccurate or missing end times which limits analyses assessing duration of therapy. Over 40,000 events and procedures were recorded but events with long durations (such as transfers) were more likely to have “end-times” missed. CONCLUSIONS: The BrainIT core dataset is a rich dataset for hypothesis generation and post-hoc analyses provided studies avoid known limitations in the dataset. Limitations in the current IT based data collection tools have been identified and have been addressed. Future academic led multi-centre data collection projects must decrease validation costs and likely will require more direct electronic access to hospital based clinical data sources for both validation purposes and for reducing the research nurse time needed for double data entry. This type of infrastructure will foster remote monitoring of patient management and protocol adherence in future trials of patient management and monitoring.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.subjectclinical networken_US
dc.subjecttraumatic brain injuryen_US
dc.subjectgriden_US
dc.subjectinterneten_US
dc.titleThe brain monitoring with information technology (BrainIT) collaborative network: EC feasibility study resultsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourneen_US
melbourne.publication.statusPublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleActa Neurochirurgicaen_US
melbourne.source.volume102en_US
melbourne.source.pages217-221en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorStell, Anthony
melbourne.contributor.authorSinnott, Richard
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record