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dc.contributor.authorWheelahan, Leesaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T22:12:44Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T22:12:44Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationWheelahan, L. (2010). Rethinking equity in tertiary education: why we need to think as one sector and not two. In VET research: leading and responding in turbulent times: AVETRA 13th Annual Conference, Gold Coast, Queensland.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/28890
dc.descriptionThis is a publisher's version of a paper from VET research: leading and responding in turbulent times: AVETRA 13th Annual Conference published by Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA). This version is reproduced with the permission of AVETRA. http://avetra.org.auen_US
dc.description.abstractEquity policy in Australian tertiary education is differentiated by educational sector, with the higher education and vocational education and training sectors having different policies, and in some cases, different definitions of equity groups. This is problematic because pathways from VET to higher education are meant to act as an equity mechanism by providing students from disadvantaged backgrounds with access to higher education. This presentation examines equity policies and definitions in both sectors, and it examines data on student pathways within VET and between VET and higher education. It finds that, apart from students with disabilities, students from disadvantaged backgrounds are over- represented in VET and under-represented in higher education. However, students from disadvantaged backgrounds are over-represented in lower-level VET qualifications and under-represented in higher-level qualifications, particularly in diplomas and advanced diplomas. This matters because diplomas are the ‘transition’ qualification which VET students use as the basis for admission to higher education. The presentation argues that the diploma is the key qualification for equity policy in both VET and higher education. Rather than separate VET and higher education equity policies and separate sectoral policies that mean pathways are of some importance only ‘at the borders’, a tertiary education policy framework will be needed that considers equity outcomes and pathways within and between sectors and places these outcomes as key concerns of both sectors. The presentation first problematises the extent to which pathways are able to act as a mechanism to support students from disadvantaged backgrounds to access higher level studies. Second, reasons why we need to consider equity from a post-compulsory or tertiary education perspective are presented, and it argues that the diploma is the key qualification for pathways and thus for equity policy. This is followed by an analysis of the relative position of equity groups in VET. Finally, the presentation considers the implications for equity policy.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAustralian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA)en_US
dc.subjecthigher educationen_US
dc.subjectvocational educationen_US
dc.subjectequityen_US
dc.subjectsocioeconomic backgrounden_US
dc.subjectdisadvantageden_US
dc.subjectpathways in educationen_US
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.titleRethinking equity in tertiary education: why we need to think as one sector and not twoen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourneen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Graduate School of Education, LH Martin Instituteen_US
melbourne.publication.statusPublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleVET research: leading and responding in turbulent times: AVETRA 13th Annual Conferenceen_US
melbourne.source.locationconferenceGold Coast, Queenslanden_US
dc.description.sourcedateconference8-9 Aprilen_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorWheelahan, Leesa
melbourne.accessrightsOpen Access


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