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dc.contributor.authorScott, Geoffen_US
dc.contributor.authorBELL, SHARONen_US
dc.contributor.authorCOATES, HAMISHen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrebennikov, Leoniden_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T22:16:22Z
dc.date.available2014-05-21T22:16:22Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationScott, G., Bell, S., Coates, H., & Grebennikov, L. (2010). Australian higher education leaders in times of change: the role of Pro Vice-Chancellor and Deputy Vice-Chancellor. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 32(4), 401-418.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11343/28930
dc.descriptionPublisher's version is restricted access in accordance with the publisher's policy.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper discusses responses provided by 31 Pro Vice-Chancellors (PVCs) and Deputy Vice-Chancellors (DVCs) who were part of a larger study of more than 500 higher education leaders in roles ranging from DVC to head of programme in 20 Australian universities. Using both quantitative and qualitative data the paper gives an insider’s perspective on what the roles of DVC and PVC are like at the daily level. It identifies the key focus of the roles, highlights the criteria these leaders use to judge that they are effectively performing them and outlines the relative impact of different influences on their work. It then discusses their views on what being in such a role is like, including its key satisfactions and challenges; and identifies the capabilities seen to be central to managing in such a context. Finally, it provides insights into how such leaders have gone about learning their role. The paper indicates how these findings can be used to address the current succession crisis for leaders in such critical roles. It shows how the data generated can be used to build leadership from within by identifying leaders with potential early on in their career, how the findings can be used to give selection processes more focus and how leadership development programmes can best be shaped to be effective. Having a high level of emotional intelligence is identified as a key ingredient in the successful delivery of such roles.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge(Taylor & Francis)en_US
dc.relation.isversionofhttp://www.informaworld.com.ezp.lib.unimelb.edu.au/openurl? genre=article&issn= 1360-080X&volume=32&issue=4&spage=401en_US
dc.subjectchange management in higher educationen_US
dc.subjectselection and learningen_US
dc.subjectuniversity leadershipen_US
dc.titleAustralian higher education leaders in times of change: the role of Pro Vice-Chancellor and Deputy Vice-Chancelloren_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
melbourne.peerreviewPeer Revieweden_US
melbourne.affiliationThe University of Melbourneen_US
melbourne.affiliation.departmentMelbourne Graduate School of Education, LH Martin Instituteen_US
melbourne.publication.statusPublisheden_US
melbourne.source.titleJournal of Higher Education Policy and Managementen_US
melbourne.source.volume32en_US
melbourne.source.issue4en_US
melbourne.source.pages401-418en_US
melbourne.elementsidNA
melbourne.contributor.authorScott, Geoffen_US
melbourne.contributor.authorBell, Sharonen_US
melbourne.contributor.authorCoates, Hamishen_US
melbourne.contributor.authorGrebennikov, Leoniden_US
melbourne.accessrightsThis item is currently not available from this repository


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